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Note: Trombone content, sax-related

From Bill Crow's 1990 book Jazz Anecdotes, recommended by Greg Fishman, in the chapter Inventions:

Duke Ellington's "Jungle Sound" was the result of early experimentation with mutes, growls and instrument modifications in line with the general trend in jazz performance to innovate novel sounds and playing techniques [hmm, bring to mind electric guitarists today and their galaxy of pedals?].

Trombonist Charlie "Plug" Irvis--predecessor of Joe "Tricky Sam" Nanton--had a mute that made his instrument sound like a sax, in the days when saxophone was a newcomer to jazz. Plug dropped his device and broke it, but by wrapping the remaining portion around the bell he achieved a sound that was an "entirely different, lecherous, low tone... no one has ever done it since," according to Duke.

Lecherous! Don't think I've heard that as a timbre descriptor before. Does it inspire me to experiment?

Example: Rainy Nights (1924), Duke Ellington's Washingtonians
https://youtu.be/2f6GMM6gxV4

Of interest to those who have the Smithsonian Collection of Classic Jazz, Charlie Irvis plays trombone on the cut Cake Walking Babies From Home (1924) by Sidney Bechet's Red Onion Jazz Babies, Bechet playing soprano sax, which also included Louis Armstrong on cornet and Lil Armstrong on piano.
https://youtu.be/PORf2RoU524
 

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Great sound. i love all things plunger mute. If they had brought one to the instrument demonstrations at my school as a kid I think I would have chosen to play brass.
 

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Huge fan of early jazz and Harlem Renaissance art in general.
 
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