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Hi, i have recently been looking into mouthpieces and doing research on all the parts of a mouthpiece. I have figured out what I am in the market for. And since I also love Gerry Mulligan's music, it was only a matter of time before I came across the Bay Mulligan model mouthpiece. But I cannot seem to find the specifics such as chamber size and facing curve, tip opening and baffle. Any info would be greatly appreciated!

Link to the mpc: http://www.charlesbaywoodwinds.com/MulliganSax.html
 

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Forum Contributor 2015-2017
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I got one in the past,made by the father, it was a very good fit to my Buffet Super Dynaction low Bb bari. the one i got, was the 7, which is .105, facing where very easy blowing, medium dark with a nice edge and lush low. the baffle is low with a small drop off at the chamber entry. very even from top to bottom. the chamber is medium.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ew7Zho_YseU
 

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Forum Contributor 2014-2017
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An alternative would be to check eBay for awhile and look for the original favored "Gale" mouthpiece that Mulligan made famous.
Here it is from Gerry Mulligan's lips to our ears: HR Gale mouthpiece. Tip opening approximately a "5". Long facing.

http://www.gerrymulligan.com/notes-from-gerry/

The mouthpiece I use is a hard rubber Gale. It was originally designed for Gregory Rico and are not too easy to find. I’ve always founds the Berg Larsen mouthpieces to be somewhat harsh in tone, especially the metal. This is of course a matter of personal preference and is a question of how responsive any given mouthpiece is to your requirements.

My mouthpiece opening is approximately a five. I say approximately because it had obviously been worked on by somebody before I acquired it. I am very fortunate because whoever worked on it really knew what he was doing. I looked a long time before I found this mouthpiece which suits my needs for most occasions.

My mouthpiece was accidentally damaged recently and I was fortunate that there is a craftsman at Van Doren in Paris who not only was able to repair the damage, but has been able to work up some new mouthpieces based on their mold, that are quite presentable. In the future they hope to duplicate my mouthpiece with the possibility of marketing it under the Van Doren name. I hope that this comes to pass since I get many enquiries from saxophone players about my mouthpiece and since it’s such an obscure manufacturer and so old, I’m not really able to be of much help.

As it happens, the opening of my mouthpiece is very unusual by today’s standards. I see that most manufacturers are putting out mouthpieces with wide-open tips with a relatively short opening for the vamp. My mouthpiece has a very long vamp that opens gradually to the tip, which is not very open at all. I find I can get a more even sound all over the horn by using a less open mouthpiece (especially the tip) and using a stiffer reed. Using a stiffer reed eliminates a lot of the buzz from the sound, which I find very unattractive.”

– Letter to Gerry Buckley. November 15, 1988
10m fan commented on the tip size of Mulligan's baritone mpc here:
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?166577-That-Mulligan-Sound

I'm not sure if he meant to say "Gale" instead of M.C. Gregory. You might PM him for further information. He mentions that it was in the .080's, which is small by today's standards. Most M.C. Gregory's and Gale's were smallish tip openings compared to today's preferences for bigger openings.

Hope this helps.

Paul




 

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In the past I get a Gregory 5A20 and i tell you, it have nothing to do with the C.Bay Mulligan model! I have at home a very old fat body Lafleur mouthpiece with an open throat with just a hint of squeeze at the throat, it is in the 85-89 tip opening and it sound very very like the Gregory when I was comparing them together. The Lafleur just get a little bit more presence, which is preferable. I trim the fat body to can be use with a tenor lig and take down the beak too, to give it more resonance like the Gregory and Gale mouthpiece.
 

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If you're looking for a less expensive high quality alternative to a Gale or Gregory, consider the Lelandais Streamline, which also appears marked Buffet or Dolnet. Low baffle (slight rollover) med. round chamber, scooped sidewallsand very close to the Gregory's in design. A very Mulliganesque vibe at a much lower cost. Identify it by a thinner body then the standard hr pickle Bari pieces with a distinctive wide silver ring on the shank.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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Avan,

Lafleur was a trademark used by Boosey and Hawkes in England for years. Boosey bought out J.R. Lafleur and Sons in 1917 and continued to stencil the name on brass, woodwinds, mouthpieces, etc., all of which were sourced from other (generally European) makers. Boosey and Hawkes seemed to change instrument sources faster than most others. With saxophone mouthpieces, there weren't that many sources available for stencils. Since "Lafluer" was not a mouthpiece maker, it is likely that your Lafleur piece is available with a variety of other names on it.

Mark
 

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Yes I know, you can have it under Conn name for example. My idea was to orient the OP to different source than the expensive Gregory and the modern Bay. I have some Lelandais too that can go in this category. From experience, this Lafleur was the closest to the original Gregory.
 
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