Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm asking because out of desperation, I custom ordered a new vintage 12 star Link from the factory and found it worked well with a Lavoz soft. I have a severe overbite and have been looking for mouthpieces that I can blow comfortably without tightening my embouchure, and people advised me go with a smaller tip, but that made things worse. Anyway, I'm wondering if there are other pieces out there with a similar open tip, low baffle profile that might be worth taking a look at. Thanks.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Logician
Joined
·
26,887 Posts
I used to play a .125" RPC rollover baffled mouthpiece on my 10M when I had it. It was a perfect match for me and the horn. Making very open tipped mouthpieces that are not a struggle to play is Ron's specialty.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
8,405 Posts
My main piece is an Otto Link Florida STM 10.
With 2.5 or 3 reed.
It feels good for me.
I too have a decent overbite.
Another member on here (mrpeebee) has played big tip links and other pieces for a long time.
Including 10* and 12* tips.
 

·
Administrator Emeritus
Joined
·
18,446 Posts
Another member on here (mrpeebee) has played big tip links and other pieces for a long time.
Including 10* and 12* tips.
That's true, my main piece is a Florida no USA 10* with La Voz medium reeds. I also have a 12 tip Early Babbitt and several other big tip lower baffle pieces. I don't have an overbite, I just play them because I love the volume they give me. I once tried a modern Link 15 tip from Hans Dulfer, the father of Candy. Could get sound of it, but that's not a piece you can play comfortably!

I recently posted a thread with clips on some of my big tip pieces (also high baffle ones, that play easier compared to lower baffle big tip pieces):
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showt...dern-and-vintage-mouthpieces-(several-brands)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
34,232 Posts
I'm asking because out of desperation, I custom ordered a new vintage 12 star Link from the factory and found it worked well with a Lavoz soft. I have a severe overbite and have been looking for mouthpieces that I can blow comfortably without tightening my embouchure, and people advised me go with a smaller tip, but that made things worse. Anyway, I'm wondering if there are other pieces out there with a similar open tip, low baffle profile that might be worth taking a look at. Thanks.
You don't need to tighten your embouchure to play a smaller tip opening. I play tip openings from .090 to .125 with an equally loose embouchure.

What you might benefit from is a mouthpiece with a shallower beak angle, so you don't have to open your mouth as much to get the reed in the correct position with respect to your lower lip.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
8,405 Posts
You don't need to tighten your embouchure to play a smaller tip opening. I play tip openings from .090 to .125 with an equally loose embouchure.

What you might benefit from is a mouthpiece with a shallower beak angle, so you don't have to open your mouth as much to get the reed in the correct position with respect to your lower lip.
This would seem to make sense as to why I tend to prefer metal pieces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Funny you say that. I actually filed down the beak quite a bit. Resale value aside, it made a big difference for me as an overbiter. I also took out much of the beak's taper so my teeth rest on a nearly flat surface instead of a steep angle. That way, I'm not fighting with my mouth slipping incrementally out. I always felt I had to fight to keep the piece in my mouth before.

You don't need to tighten your embouchure to play a smaller tip opening. I play tip openings from .090 to .125 with an equally loose embouchure.

What you might benefit from is a mouthpiece with a shallower beak angle, so you don't have to open your mouth as much to get the reed in the correct position with respect to your lower lip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A 15??? Geeze, I'm intrigued. What is the measurement on that? Like a 180? It must have been metal, right? I can't imagine a rubber piece would have enough material to remove to widen the til that much.
Thanks for the link. I'll check em out.
When you say the higher baffles play easier, what do you mean? Easier to articulate?
That's true, my main piece is a Florida no USA 10* with La Voz medium reeds. I also have a 12 tip Early Babbitt and several other big tip lower baffle pieces. I don't have an overbite, I just play them because I love the volume they give me. I once tried a modern Link 15 tip from Hans Dulfer, the father of Candy. Could get sound of it, but that's not a piece you can play comfortably!

I recently posted a thread with clips on some of my big tip pieces (also high baffle ones, that play easier compared to lower baffle big tip pieces):
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showt...dern-and-vintage-mouthpieces-(several-brands)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
Not sure if you are committed to a low baffle mpc. There are some players that seem to feel that playing a high baffle piece is a form of cheating, or something. If you are not one of those players, you might try a high baffle piece. Life is too short to swim upstream for your entire playing career struggling with a low baffle piece to make a statement!

I play a ss Berg, 120/0 offset M, which is a high baffle piece. I got lucky about 55 years ago and bought a good one - it helped my playing career enormously back in the day. Mostly, I use 2 1/2 bari reeds and most of those I sand with a piece of emery cloth, so that they probably play a little softer than a 2 1/2. I can scream or subtone with this mpc.

Haven't met a sax yet that doesn't work well with my Berg!

I believe decades ago tenor players used smaller tips and harder reeds, and I think the trend today is to use bigger tip openings and softer reeds.

My Berg allows me to be expressive, with a lot of edge, without too much brilliance, and without a lot of work.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
8,405 Posts
I think the assumption is that a more open tip with a lower baffle is harder work.
When often it can be the opposite.
Finding what works for you is what matters.
A good facing on a large tip with a lower baffle takes no more effort to play.
But if it's a brighter sound you want, you will likely get it with less air on a higher baffled piece.
 

·
Administrator Emeritus
Joined
·
18,446 Posts
A 15??? Geeze, I'm intrigued. What is the measurement on that? Like a 180? It must have been metal, right? I can't imagine a rubber piece would have enough material to remove to widen the til that much.
Thanks for the link. I'll check em out.
When you say the higher baffles play easier, what do you mean? Easier to articulate?
The Link 15 was a modern metal STM. I think Candy bought it in New York for her father. Huge tip, but not really a piece to consider to play for real!

Lower baffle pieces ask more air to project, with higher baffle pieces that goes much easier. The metal Durga 12* or Robusto 11* pieces I have are examples, also the Ponzol Super 120, they play very easy without much effort (the 12* Durga plays like my 10* Florida). Articulation depends more on the quality of the tip rails.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
297 Posts
The Link 15 was a modern metal STM. I think Candy bought it in New York for her father. Huge tip, but not really a piece to consider to play for real!

Lower baffle pieces ask more air to project, with higher baffle pieces that goes much easier. The metal Durga 12* or Robusto 11* pieces I have are examples, also the Ponzol Super 120, they play very easy without much effort (the 12* Durga plays like my 10* Florida). Articulation depends more on the quality of the tip rails.
Very interesting conversation! I played a vandoren t10 for 6 years until last spring when I got a t11 (135).....I do remember that it was more stress on my throat if I forced but, that's a bad habit that I am always work8ng to break. H9wever, about now I don't notice much difference!
Maybe I should go down to a normal tip but, it just seems more fun to drive a HemI.....
 

·
Administrator Emeritus
Joined
·
18,446 Posts
H9wever, about now I don't notice much difference!
Maybe I should go down to a normal tip but, it just seems more fun to drive a HemI.....
Newjazz, my advise is always to play that mouthpiece that delivers you what you want in the most easy way. In your case I would go for the t10 if you don't find much advantages in the t11. You probably know it already, but playing big tips also can have serious disadvantages. Intonation and control can be tricky, depending on how much you play and your talent. For me big tips are tricky, but I still prefer them because for me the advantages are bigger then the disadvantages (which also depends on what you expect from a piece and what your goals in making music are of course).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
297 Posts
a salut to you for the concrete advice!....you're damm right about intonation and control in general. this is a battle i am obsessed with so much that i am only now getting some break through. my explanation as to why i am fighting to stick with it is simply because the SOUND! Its fat, complex, and dynamic!..... and very NEWK!
it seems to be the ultimate tenor tone! maybe one day i will settle for a normal if i deem its limiting me making music.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
12* sounds extreme, I could never drive a thing like that in a sax section, but if one commit to a larger opening and the increased flexibility, that will give advantages if your ears are good enough.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
8,405 Posts
I think the intonation worry is more of a concern if you automatically assume that a more open tip requires a much softer reed.
I went from 8-8* to a 10 tip and continued to use either 2.5 hard or 3 soft reeds.
Intonation is no better nor worse.
Actually it is better in the palm notes.
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top