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Discussion Starter #1
Its amazing how my kid can find ways for me to spend $1000's for her and to fill about 100 hours of activities into her 24 hour day.
She is curious about the oboe to triple on with the sax and clarinet.

Is the oboe a unique beast? the complex and expensive double reeds makes me think its a big project..

So who has done it and what can they share?

Player is a soon to be a senior in high school with around 6 years of playing

Thx
 

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Flute would be the better choice.

Oboe, you'd need to rent one. I doubt you'd want to shell out over a thousand for an oboe. And reeds, bought, are anywhere from $7 to nearly $30....for one reed. The better/cheaper way is to make them, but that really requires time with a teacher.

I'd ask the band director to see if you can borrow/check out an oboe. Then try some store bought medium or medium soft reeds.
 

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im playing oboe,now more as a hobby really!..its a challenge, and most feel its harder than sax or clarinet! i agree but the effort is well worth the time put in!.
The main thing is to get a decent teacher especially for embouchure formation, you dont want to get off to bad habits early on with the oboe!.
 

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thx, not sure if our high school owns one...the local rental place charges around $35/mo with a 3 month minimum plan. those reeds remind me of hand tied fishing lures. my old high school teacher made his own in his office.
 

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if you do go down the road of oboe"try and find a good reputable reed maker!, thats a major point to playing the oboe, having a good reed.
 

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I've dabbled...even owned one for a while, but it's not my cup of tea. It's not just the double reed issue either...I love playing bassoon, but I have never found much enjoyment playing oboe.

But everyone is different, and the only way to really know if it's something she will enjoy is to get her one to try out for a while (at least a month or two).

It's great that she's getting the chance to try different instruments. While it can get expensive to play/own multiple instruments...there are far worse things that she could be into!
 

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I played one through jr. high and high school in concert band. It's a lovely instrument, but very demanding. The reeds finally made me give it up.
 

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My daughter is 15, and plays both alto sax and oboe as her primary instruments. You won't be able to get an oboe from your daughter's high school, I don't think. Mine started off renting a plastic one when she started in 4th grade, then we bought a used intermediate oboe, and now she has a professional oboe. Get lessons right away so she doesn't start off with mistakes--I'd recommend getting a teacher who will make her reeds. My daughter's teacher gives her free oboe reeds, and he doesn't charge more for lessons than anyone else. And they are much better than anything you will find in a store. The oboe reeds are a big deal--far more of an issue than either clarinet or sax reeds. Mine can now make her own reeds--but she doesn't have time to make all she needs. So I order some online which work great--but they are $20 apiece!

My daughter does not find oboe hard. She says her sax and clarinet practice help her on oboe.
 

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Yes, the oboe is a unique creature that you do not approach lightly. I think at this point it would be silly for her to try to learn how to make her own reeds--she doesn't have the time. But that's okay. You can buy ready-made reeds, either mass produced for cheap (not recommended) or hand-made for dollops o' dough (recommended).

But she may be thinking that just because it uses a reed and looks like a clarinet, she can play it. She will be in for a shock. Oboe is completely removed from single-reed instruments. She may be able to huff and puff on it for a while and learn some fingerings, but if she wants to become even mediocre on it, she will need a real oboe teacher.

I would not invest 1000s of dollars on an oboe for her at this point. If the local instrument store will not rent one to you, try to find a cheapie on ebay for a few 100. They are out there. This will cure her of her curiosity and help her realize what a commitment it will be.
 

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I considered the oboe for a while but the time and effort it takes to make reeds changed my mind. If they ever make a good synthetic reed for it maybe.
 

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If your daughter wants to go pro, adding oboe as a double is a big plus. The reeds are a pain, true, but fingerings are quite similar and easy to pick up from sax (IME, although I went the other way) and the second register of the clarinet.
 

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I played oboe before I sold it and got a tenor sax. The tone of an oboe can be gorgeous. For me, the reason to stop playing the oboe was that the repertoire was limited, and I couldn't play jazz on it. I liked how a saxophone mouthpiece is uncomparably more flexible than an oboe reed. On oboe there is only one way to play it: the correct way. Any other way makes it sound like a squealing pig. The advantage of having had oboe lessons before was that learning to play the saxophone was a cinch.

Reine

Reine
 

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flute will be a bigger challenge i believe- no octave key, completely different way to play an instrument, fingerings go strange the higher you go, takes a while to develop a good tone on flute, i know teachers who are mainly on clarinet and sax and they can't go very high on the flute even though they can play it. oh and intonation 3:)
 

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~ Years ago I realized the only person that can help me be a better oboe player is me. I found a source for reeds, kept a stash in my immediate reach and studied my tail off.

One of the best reeds to buy is a DUSTE' in SanFran at Forrests music. Playing oboe enhanced my sax playing.

Here's your advise- DO IT.
 

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Oboe is challenging and, for me, has contributed to me being a better saxophone player. The reed issue is best addressed in the long run by learning to make your own as they are prohibitively expensive for most of us. You can always shop for a good used oboe to get started with or just rent for the three months you mentioned and see how it goes.

And it's GREAT you support your child's interest in music. It's a small expense when you think of all the things young people can get into today. Good luck!
 

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The first thing I thought of when I read the title to your post was; Oboe and sax... hmm so that's how we got the the C melody.

Harv
 

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I don't dabble in the "black arts", such as spell casting and oboe playing.

But seriously, I bought my wife an oboe and had planned to do some duets with soprano sax. But she never learned to play the thing and eventually asked me to sell it and buy her something else.

And believe there are lots of great possibilities with the oboe and sop.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
flute will be a bigger challenge i believe- no octave key, completely different way to play an instrument, fingerings go strange the higher you go, takes a while to develop a good tone on flute, i know teachers who are mainly on clarinet and sax and they can't go very high on the flute even though they can play it. oh and intonation 3:)
thx. she has a flute too, but it got a bit sidetracked as the necessity to double on clarinet this year in school took priority. but it is on the summer list of music projects !
 

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"flute will be a bigger challenge i believe- no octave key, completely different way to play an instrument, fingerings go strange the higher you go, takes a while to develop a good tone on flute, i know teachers who are mainly on clarinet and sax and they can't go very high on the flute even though they can play it. oh and intonation 3"

I found flute to be a ton easier than oboe. The octave key issue is not a problem--you just firm up the lower lip and blow faster air across the hole. And you have no reeds to worry about!

Yes, the third octave of the flute has odd fingerings, but you don't play up there that much. The upper part of the oboe (D#, E, F) is much more challenging and you're expected to play up there much more often than the third octave of the flute.

A teacher who can't go into the third octave on the flute simply hasn't practiced it enough (and certainly should not be teaching flute!). As far as tone and intonation go, it takes a while to develop them on any instrument.
 

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I agree with jaysne. My daughter is learning the flute (her 5th instrument), 5 minutes at a time, when she can squeeze it in. After about five short sessions using the Pneumo Pro flute, she was then able to get a clean sound on the flute. Fingerings are easy and similar to sax. The third octave would take work, but compared to learning the oboe, the oboe is much harder due to the double reed.
 
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