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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I gave up playing sax over 20 years ago and have now just began to play again.

Just before I stopped playing I bought a clarinet with the idea of learning to play. I gave up quite quickly as I found the different fingering on each register confusing and I already played sax and piano so didn't see the need to bother.

Anyway, as I have now started to relearn sax, I thought I might have another try at learning clarinet too.

I'd be grateful for any advice with starting to play clarinet as a second reed instrument.

Also, is my B & H wooden Edgeware with Brilhart Ebolin mpc a good setup for me? (Not that I can necessarily afford to change it at the moment)
 

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Since you just started playing sax again I would concentrate on it for a while. Then maybe you can go on to clarinet. The best tip is only one word-PRACTICE.
 

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I agree prob concentrate on sax for now - you should find progress easier there than on clarinet. I'm no great expert on clt m/ps but i believe as a matter of fact an original B&H m/p would be a better match for the instrument. All the best.
 

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I would personally concentrate on clarinet rather than sax. Once you get the sax up to speed, the clarinet is still going to be a daunting obstacle. But if you tackle the clarinet first, the sax will fall into place without much trouble.

As far as specific advice, the only I can give is to start with a fingering chart and learn your scales as high as you can play them. After that, maybe work out of a sax etude book if you've got one, or possibly read some other music. You might also try to find a teacher for a few lessons, just to get you on the right path.
 

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Vince said:
I found the different fingering on each register confusing
In my mind I don't deal with two or three different registers, I see 40-odd different notes. Each blob on the sheet is one distinctive finger combination. This may sound over-complicated, but in the long run it's - IME - easier than remembering four different flavours of "F". ("what register am I supposed to be in now?"). But I guess either approach has its pros and cons.

<turns prayer wheel>practice...practice...practice...practice< />
 

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You know what's coming: -

Find a capable specialist clarinet teacher - any other approach is simply asking for long-term trouble.

If you contact you county peripatetic music teachers someone should be able to put you on the right track.

Bon Voyage
 

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DougR said:
You know what's coming: -

Find a capable specialist clarinet teacher - any other approach is simply asking for long-term trouble.
Rubbish. :)

But I agree, a person to stop you from Doing Silly Things With Your Instrument isn't a bad idea. Needn't be a Clarinet teacher. Heck, even a Sax teacher would do. :twisted: <hides behind screen>
 

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There are some people who can handle both instruments well - sadly there are lots who manage one moderately and the other badly -> Can you tell the difference?

The question is Do you feel lucky, punk.
 

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since you used to play sax, and only started learning the clarinet 20 years ago i think it would be more rewarding for you to relearn sax first. Then pick up the clarinet. it gives your more familiarity with the instrument fingers plus you may have to relearn all the music notation "stuff". might as well make it a little bit easier.


This is opposite of a clarinet player i'm helping who knows a little of sax who stopped playing decades ago too. But he is progressing fantastically on clarinet and after a couple more months we'll be adding sax.

I think the familiarity is key as it would be more personally rewarding for the player but then, you may want to really, really learn clarinet first ??

and a teacher isn't a bad idea either, especially if they can play both really well
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well I guess I'll stick with sax only for now then. I'm considering taking a few lessons on sax to get me back up to speed more quickly.

Perhaps I'll consider getting the clarinet checked over ready for playing later.
 

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I guess it depends how much time you have to devote to this newfound / rediscovered hobby, and also how much progress you make.

Personally I dont have the time to devote to mastering both, but I do enjoy playing both (and tenor too) I started on Clarinet, and still have my B&H Edgeware, there is nothing wrong with the instrument. The stock mouthpiece is quite closed, I replaced it with a Vandoren B46, which is more open and makes switching back and forth from the sax easier.

I find the clarinet a lot more unforgiving in general, and after playing (and enjoying the differences) I find my sax playing has improved too. Thats not necessarily true going the other way:)

If you have the time to devote to it, and its not totally frustrating, then I see no reason not to dabble with both. Lets face it, us late returnees to music are not about to go set the world on fire with our ability, so do what is most fun for you. After a while the non matching register thing on clarinet becomes second nature switching back and forth..but maybe thats just cos I had it beaten into me as a small child:)

Good Luck, just remember this is supposed to be fun, not a chore.
 

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The only advice I would give to you is practice faithfully, and don't give up.

It's like anything--the more you do it, the better you get.

When I started clarinet after five years of sax, I was frustrated often. I remember yelling out loud once during a particularly trying practice session, "I'm never going to learn this instrument!" But I kept going, got through many rough patches, learned it, and was playing it professionally soon enough.

But you have to want it. If it's driving you crazy and you don't really want to do it, quit. Otherwise, treat it like the new foundling it is, with love, care, and patience.
 
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