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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys! I'm new here and wanted to introduce myself showing you a cool old flute i found and hopefully one of you might have more information regarding its history!

I bought this flute around 10 years ago on a flea market, it has a very faded Buffet Crampon logo (with Brevete SGDG beneath it). It's missing two keys on the foot that i'll try to build repurposing the keys from an old clarinet (at least i'll try), i have some experience and equipment for making silver jewelry so i might be able to do something. It has 5 pieces (when google searching i found that most vintage wooden flutes have 4).

Sadly i don't have the mouthpiece with me right now but i'll also attach a picture i found online of one that looks very similar to the one i have, i'll post a picture of it tomorrow or the next day. Does anyone have more information? In the barrel, there's a serial # that reads: 421159 (i'll attach a picture also). Let me know what you think!

Wood Writing implement Office supplies Pen Hardwood
Musical instrument Trigger Shotgun Gun accessory Musical instrument accessory
Hand Bicycle part Finger Auto part Cylinder
Finger Nail Thumb Cylinder Electric blue

This one IS NOT the actual mouthpiece of the flute, but it looks like it (except that mine doesn't have that ring near the joint):

Office supplies Bumper Gas Writing implement Office equipment

Thanks and nice to meet you all!
 

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Correct forum. That is a modern type mouthpiece and probably will not work with the body. I think the body is conical (tapered a bit smaller at the low end) and the head is parabolic for a cylindrical body. If so, the intonation would be terrible. Another problem is that with the wood barrel fitting, it would require a head much shorter, maybe 2". Owing to the missing keys, and the number of these for sale, I would be easier to just find one with all the parts and go from there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey Bruce! Thank you for your reply!

Yeah, that's not the actual mouthpiece, it just looks like it like i mentioned before. I'll post a picture of the actual mouthpiece tomorrow!
 

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These are, in my experience, very common flutes albeit not under the brand Buffet Crampon.

Generally used in Irish music or Cuban Charanga bands, they are often pitched much lower than modern flutes (unless they are high pitch 457Hz in which case things get a lot less nice).

The fact that it is branded Buffet DOESN'T necessarily mean that it was made by them, in fact it is almost certain that it was bought to be sold under their brand. Buffet started buying flutes extremely earlier on and reselling them.

Many British and French brands, but also German and Italian.

This is what it probably looked like.

http://www.oldflutes.com/im/comp/buffet.jpg

This type of flute has generally a very short tunable headjoint with a tuning metal sleeve inside and then there is a barrel on the body where the short headjoint slides in.

You can certainly build the keys but the question will always be whether it will be worth the effort since this type of flute is never really expensive or worth much.

http://www.oldflutes.com/french.htm

http://greylarsen.com/revisions/majorchanges/p.454.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hey guys! Thanks for the information!

I agree that there might be a bad investment to fix this flute, the thing is that in my country they are not very common so fixing it would give me the chance to try a new instrument, but as you can imagine, fixing it would be more expensive than if i lived in the US or Europe. I'll attach a couple more pictures for you to see! If i end up fixing it i'll post pictures of the process.

BTW i think the barrel is not original, it has a lighter color and the metallic rings are also different.

Thank you very much for your replies!

Hand Watch Shotgun Musical instrument accessory Wood
Hand Wood Finger Thumb Nail
Musical instrument Wood Tin Wind instrument Bicycle part
 

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I don't know where you country is where they are not easy to find but these days, with ebay, things are easy to find everywhere and these flutes have a very limited market, so there is a lot of them out there. Because often the keys are made of solid silver a lot have lost keys.

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...flute.TRS0&_nkw=antique+8+keys+flute&_sacat=0

That the tuning barrel isn't of the same color doesn't mean it isn't original since the wood might have discolored in time ( the wood was probably darkened). The head joint has a split as so often happens with these flutes.
 

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The keywork indicates that it is from the late 19th or early 20th century--right around the time that the Boehm system finally edged out the 8 key simple system. That being said, I played a similar Buffet and thought it quite nice as simple system flutes go. It could well be pitched around A=435, but could also be at 440, and anyway 435 should generally be playable except in cold weather.

I agree that unless you want to do it for love, building keys for the footjoint is hardly worth the effort, but it could be a fun project if you have time on your hands. I have an old 8 key flute and it does nothing but sit in my closet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Awesome information! I think the best idea is to try and fix it as a fun project and maybe to pass it on to other musicians so they can enjoy it. Of corse i'll post pictures in here of the process.

Being that it's not a particularly valuable instrument, it might also be good to start exploring and learning on how to fix old instruments. Thank you very much for the information!

Take care guys!
 

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I don’t think this will be easy to pass on to anyone once you are done with it, unless you donate it, for free, to a Cuban Charanga Young Player.

You have a split headjoint and are missing two keys.

Your interest of learning to fix flutes will be best served by fixing a flute that acquires value when finished. This is worthless now and will be worth less than its parts and time when finished.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm not really thinking of market value, just on having a new instrument and eventually giving it to others, i'm not looking to make money out of it

Thanks for the info
 
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