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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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Discussion Starter #1
I was just wondering. I am restoring a Leblanc that I picked up from A. Greene about a month ago. I am almost done with the job, and those white clarinet roopads look great and seal well. I am going to finish it tonight and try it out.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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Discussion Starter #2
Just finished up the instrument..I have to say I am pleasantly surprised..
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I didn't have low expectation....Musicmedic has some good stuff. Just I was worried about fitting them etc, as any kind of leather is going to be thicker than bladder skin. I was surprised in how well they went is and seated. Just that I am always skeptical of "new" stuff until I try it out. End result, they get a huge thumbs up from me. Especially since my experiences with roopads on sax suggests that I wont have to change pads for a very long time....They are WAY more durable than bladder skin or leather. Anyways....I have nothing bad to say about them at all.
 

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Pisoni Weatherproof deluxe basoon pads works like a charm on clarinets. Better, WAY better than roos.
 

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I'm more inclined to using coated leather pads on clarinets when I have to (usually CLG brown or white leather bassoon pads which are firm), though my first choice is cork pads and leather pads for the large padcups from Ab/Eb downwards.

As RooPads aren't coated I'd suspect they'll be more porous than I would like and they are soft - although they will probably suit Oehler systems.
 

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Guys,

Thanks for all the great comments about the RooPads for Clarinet.

FYI, there is a bladder under the leather to keep moisture and air from seeping through. Basically we make a premium (very nice pressed felt) bladder pad and cover it with the thinnest RooPad material we can. The result should be an airtight pad that is extremely stable.

Hope that helps.
 

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I've got a Yamaha alto clarinet that has been repadded with annoying sticky plastic coated leather pads (and they're brown) so maybe I'll order a set to try them out.

Basically we make a premium (very nice pressed felt) bladder pad and cover it with the thinnest RooPad material we can.
I wonder which part of the kangaroo's anatomy they source the thinnest leather from?
 

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I wonder which part of the kangaroo's anatomy they source the thinnest leather from?
If Curt is smart, and I think he is, he'll work his supplier to ensure that all the leather in his roo pads is cut from the back section. If you imagine any leather as being a sandwich of all the layers of skin, the leather at the flank and neck is like a loosely made sandwich. The leather on the back is like a tightly pressed sandwich. Flank leather is weak and stretchy. Back leather is firm and that's what's used by those who work with roo. The flank is used as filler etc.

The only downside with the back of a roo is that it gets scarred from ducking under barbed wire fences. (You're all wondering why they don't just jump over the fences? If you grew up anywhere on or near a farm you'll know why. When I was young and had no sense, I got my balls caught on a barbed wire fence....etc)

Anyhow, the back leather is then put through a splitter and split down to the required thickness. The beauty of roo, is that Wombat leather aside, it is stronger than any other I've ever seen or heard of for a given thickness. This means you can split it down to far, far thinner than a roo sax pad and it still won't tear or stretch. Provided you take the appropriate steps, you can split roo down to thinner than a sheet of paper and it's still strong because of the fine grain. This is what they used to do on those old leather topped desks you see in some old homes.

The whole thing about roo being porous really gives me the ****s. It is an urban myth started by one repairer who knows sweet bugger all about leather and even less about roo. Reinforced by his followers, it has now become accepted as fact when it is utter BS.

Guys, when tanned and prepared properly, roo is less porus than your kid leather pads. Roo is a fur animal with very fine follicles. Goats have much coarser hair than roo fur and they are grouped differently as well.

They whole argument is stupid anyway because all leather is porous. that's why it breathes.
 

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Thanks for the background. I use Saxgourmet pads as my first choice when repadding saxes and have used RooPads twice. To me, the RooPads felt much softer although I've had no complaints from the customers whose saxes I repadded with them.

So the thinnest, finest kangaroo leather is sourced from the back of the pelt and not the lips or eyelids as I thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I actually took a 37mm roopad that I had that was extra, and tried to tear the leather by hand......NOPE....that stuff is tough as crap...thats why I like it....I think its far less prone to cutting on the regular tone holes.
 
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