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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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I searched the setups thread and found no one with a 444. Over in the Klarinet archives, there were a few people that herald these things as the superior big bore clarinet of the big band era. Might anyone here have experience with them? I found one in good shape but am ambivalent whether to invest in an overhaul or resell it. I've already a Leblanc LL slated for overhaul as well as an R-13 (and a Jazz Festival on its way). It's the Year of the Clarinet!

I guess that's what happens once you are finally satisfied with your tenor needs. :cool:
 

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Researcher, Teacher and Horn Revitalizer, Forum Co
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The 444s are very nice clarinets - made in the hey-day of Conn. They seem to have a limited following and thus can be had for very little. A friend of mine (who doesn't play clarinet) has one in new-unused condition sitting in his closet.

They play realy nice with the big bore, but they apparently have a few intonation issues - i'm not sure whether it can be corrected or not as I have not had one in my hands for a complete overhaul - just for checks
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member and Forum Contributor 20
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What do you hope to do with it? The LL is certainly a more universally accepted clarinet, and the Jazz Festival is one of those rare Buffet commodities that at least has brand name recognition - kind of like my Buffet Super Dynaction clarinet. The 444 will play big, but intonation will be a chore. At least one player I know helped his Conn with a custom made barrel, but cost of 444 + overhaul + barrel may be too big a pill to swallow.
 

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Fred said:
The 444 will play big, but intonation will be a chore. At least one player I know helped his Conn with a custom made barrel, but cost of 444 + overhaul + barrel may be too big a pill to swallow.
Fred, I respectfully but completely disagree with you about 444N intonation. I play one and absolutely love it. Maybe your friend's horn is an early serial #. I don't know if that really would make a difference tho. Mine is from 1939 and again, I don't have any more intonation problems with it than I've had with previous Buffet's and Selmer's that I've owned/played.

John
 

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That's what makes these beasts unique - there are no absolutes. Just like in saxes, each instrument may be a peach or a prune. You got a peach!
 
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