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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Thanks for sharing that, Ves.

FWIW, sticking pads and stiff springs are common on new horns, regardless of price, and easily fixed. Things such as tone character, response, ergonomics, and intonation are not so easily fixed. I look for the long term potential of a horn and dial in the adjustments in the first few months of getting to know a horn.

It‘s a good feeling to know that you’ve tried more than a few horns and are happy with what you’ve got. Enjoy your horn.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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But yes, if you wanted to fix that pad and change out the springs, then it would just be that one of the Bb fingerings and the low D are stuffy. Otherwise, the ProOne is a nice instrument.
You don’t yet seem to understand how saxophones work. You don’t have to change out the springs to adjust their tension. And yes, you can just change out one pad for very little effort (or money). If the rest of the horn rings your bell, it’s a good way to go.

If the seat and steering wheel of your new car were in the wrong position, would you send it back?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Well, now it's pooped on so I'll have to go cry in my soup.
That sounds so sad.

That's the two horns I had, I did the research, I told you how it came out.
Trying two horns with little-to-no playing experience does not make it "research" any more than boiling water makes you either a chef, engineer or scientist.

But I asked him, how would we come to an understanding of where to put the spring forces? My guess is lower by about 40%. But if the ProOne is as well thought out as we would like to believe, then maybe, the higher spring forces are there because they are necessary. Those keys with the trident arms especially may have some mass. If the spring force is too low, maybe the action will be too slow. On the other hand, for the always closed holes, will they still seal properly? Just because they can do it, is it a good idea to do it? He couldn't answer that question and said he check with his senior tech.
These are good questions. I doubt that the tech is going to measure the spring force of each key, and even if they could, it would still not be meaningful.

You're right about having to overcome the inertia of keys with higher mass. Another issue is overcoming the friction of the rods inside the tubes, as well as at the bearing surfaces at the end of the tubes. Lighter spring tension is not always better. At some point, the keys will just start to feel slow to return to their rest position.

G'luck in your quest.
 
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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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I think it's always helpful to upload a video of your playing when you're reviewing a product. But always better to share than not share.
A brief biography would be useful. It is useful to know whether the presenter has any pertinent experience, what kind of music they play, and their baseline setup.
 
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