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The sticky pads issue is still a mystery to me. For my two tenors (Yany and Antigua), the pads on Yany are sticky so that I have to use the Yamaha Powder paper once for a whole to avoid sticky G#, while my Antigua Tenor pads are not sticky at all. For my two soprano (still Yany and Antigua), it is just on the reverse order, as Yany is not sticky at all and Antigua is sticky. Interesting....
 

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This is an interesting thread because...per their reputations...the Eastern vs. the ProOne should be like comparing apples and oranges....

Eastern, unless I am very wrong, has yet to produce a really good, pro-calibre sax. They do not seem to be a company which utilizes a factory which has that goal, necessarily. (Again, this just from what I have read...granted I do not pay much attention to budget-priced chinese horns, so maybe they are producing one). Some have been better than others, of the reviews I have read. But no reviews particularly had the expectation of them being pro horns. More "what you get for the money" sorta echelon.

While the One HAS gotten some good feedback over the years, and while it is nowhere near achieveing the rep of a Yama, Yani, Selmer, etc., (and the cryogenic thing, fer godssake) again I have seen a fair amount kind words on that model from seemingly serious players.

But again, reputation online, particularly of models which relatively speaking are not in widespread use...is often quite specious

I agree with most respondents...sticking pads and spring tensions being the reason for a full return and refund ?

Mmmmmmmmm.....mmmmmmm.......(?) Two things so easily correctible by a tech for less than $100 for sure...or even by a DIY'er with some experience. Woodwinds are not guitars, brass, percussion...whenever you got pads and springs and corks and felts which either make or break the instrument's performance....a tech set-up and some tweaking on a brand new horn is nothing outlandish to expect at all.

You see, when I read these reviews...here is what usually jumps out (and it does here as well): there's no real assessment of the quality/precision of the build nor the response of the horn beyond ergos.

Is there key play ? Are the keys 'soft' ? How do the screws act in their post holes ? Is the body metal light or substantial ? Are the toneholes level ?

Then the next thing becomes blowing response. How well does each horn react to subtle changes in blowing ? Is the tonality of the horn consistent up and down the registers ? (Many horns, for example, have a wonderful quality on the lower octave, but some of that beauty vanishes on the upper octaves).

Lastly what about tonality ? Brightness/darkness/harmonic spread/foucus, things like that ?

Things like this. So, basically, the review becomes simply based on playtesting, with no attention paid to how the horn was really fabricated; and in some cases no assessment of how the horn responds intonationally and blowing wise.

Anyways, no particulary trying to 'say' anything other than the comparison as presented, is using a fairly limited scope of testing to come to a result which covers most of the bases.

Not criticizing OP, if you are happy with the Eastern, great, enjoy it.
Initially I thought OP refers to "Eastman" vs "Antigua Pro-One", until I read your reply and notice that it is actually the "Eastern Music". I took a look on their website and found this:
Alto Saxophone ala Yanagisawa A-991 – Eastern Music (emmusicstore.com)

So they basically sell a fake Yany A-991, but meanwhile try to waive any legal responsibility by adding "ala" in front of the Yany. I guess OP's "Ref 45" is also a wording game to make it sound like "Ref 54"......

The horn may play well itself, but based on this behavior I really doubt the credit of this company.
 

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I know that many online stores will include a complete new horn setup when the buyer purchases new horn from them. But based on my shallow experiences (of four times ordering online), their so-called new horn setup are at best simple visual inspection and minimal adjustment. Some of the issues are apparently not due to transportation, but they can be easily fixed by local tech though. I don't think they may even bother to run a leak light or put mouthpiece on the horn to test play it.

Still, you should give a Pro one another chance, especially considering that you are comparing it with Eastern tenor....
 
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