Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,071 Posts
An educated guess is that the Antigua might be manufactured in one of the factories in Hebei, in either the Beijing or Tianjin municipalities. A couple of Taiwanese musical instrument companies relocated to Tianjin a few years ago. I know of one very modern plant there that was (the last time that I checked) a Sino-American joint venture.

There's another saxophone-only manufacturer in Shandong province that has been in business almost as long as KHS (Jupiter) has been in business.

The fact that Chinese manufacturer reps won't broadcast information isn't any indication of a desire to deceive. It's just a cultural trait to give out minimal information.

It's like the guy who asks a shop owner if his dog bites. The guy pets the dog in the shop and gets mauled.

--- I thought you said that your dog doesn't bite.

"That's not my dog."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,071 Posts
Milandro, thanks for the video reference. I watched it to see what clues there might be as to whether the facility is located in China or Taiwan. Among the usual clues are inscriptions like "safety first", which may be either in simplified or the old characters, but I couldn't see any of them.

Still, I am inclined to think that the facility is in Taiwan. The equipmwnt is moder, but well used. This suggest that it has been used for a decade or more. There is less uniformity in workers clothing than one is likely to find in a modern Chinese factory. Then there are the post-it notes. That looks like Taiwan, as does the plastic coffee cup inscribed with "cafe au lait".

Not exactly powerful evidence, I admit.
The characters won't give you a clue to the location. You'll still find the traditional Chinese characters interspersed with modern "simplified" characters for a couple of reasons, the most common being that in some cases, there is no simplified character to express a given concept. The second is that the traditional characters are often used in commercial nomenclature to imply tradition and higher status.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,071 Posts
as for on the other thread about taiwanese saxophones my sources assure me that things are very much more complicated on Taiwan (and China) as they appear to be in the west.
True. Markets in China are volatile. There's a market-driven need on the part of China for their products to gain acceptance in the west as Chinese products. Price point acceptance won't keep the international Chinese manufacturing machine going forever. Wage demands are rising. Government standards and demands of industries are becoming tighter and better-focused. Just as important is the fact that material costs are rising. The Chinese need a bigger bang for their buck-- um-- renminbi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,071 Posts
appears very efficient... in my past experience, the Chinese export the garbage, and keep the good stuff for themselves. Perhaps this is changing
WHOA! Try to convince the Chinese of this! My experience and the opinions of Chinese friends tell me the opposite! I went shopping with a neighbor recently, and he steered me away from a very nice Chinese-made DVD player to a Sony. My Chinese friends have Samsung (Korean) TVs, and drive Japanese cars (even though some of the Chinese automobiles rival the Japanese in build).

How far back is your experience? Things have changed considerably during the past ten years.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top