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The tune is almost always played in concert F (D on an Eb alto). It starts on the tonic (your D . . . the first note of the alto's D scale; so, 1-3-4-5, 1-3-4-5, etc.).

It is SO simple, I'll bet you could sound it out and never need to see the written music. DAVE
 

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csfsmash,

AsDave said, this one is pretty simple. You've posteda few requests for sheet music and to your credit, you've actually offered a transcription in return.
I'd suggest purchasing a fake book, if standards are what you're looking for. If it's just pop, novelty tunes and rock sax breaks, then I'd suggest getting some music notation software. You can then do a google search for the midi file of whatever song you're looking for, import it into the software program and extract the sax part as sheet music. The better the midi file, the better the sheet music.
Try finale or sibelius or similar.
If you want to try transcribing the songs yourself, download Audacity and use it to loop and slow down passages, etc.
 

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And to piggy-back, and I mean no disrespect, "Saints" is really simple. So if you can work the song out yourself, it will give you a good beginning on learning to hear with more accuracy and that is something you are really going to need in the future..if not right now.

Caveat - if one simply doesn't know a tune and wants to learn it that might be a little different. But if you know the tune and it's not complex, it's much better to take some time learning it by ear or writing it down from memory because this process gets easier every time you do it.
 

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And another thing...."oh when the Saints" is a must tune to have "in your head and under your fingers."

As Gary said, learning this tune will really help you train your ear. The first two notes make an interval of a Major 3rd. Being able to hear this interval and pre-hear it, is a big deal.

The 3rd (major and minor) is what makes a chord major or minor. If you can hear a major 3rd (when the saints) and hear a minor 3rd, (Georgia on my mind) you can hear the difference between a major and minor chord.
 

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Also, you should check out that Altosax 911 website. Google: altosax 911

rory
 

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There is a really good Aebersold Play along book called "St. Louis Blues". It's all popular Dixieland tunes, fun to play and great for learning improvising on those basic chord changes.
 
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