Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
4,507 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Selmer VI tenor, only one serial number away from my previous job posted here.
One owner, bought it new in 1966.
Overhauled only once like 20 years ago, job done by an elder band repairer that did many "less than ideal" mods.

this is going to be fully overhauled, full trill keys and stuff removed, I'll repair the "less than ideal" things and hand polish and relacquer.

Album here:
https://picasaweb.google.com/jicaino/Selmer12XXX1Tenor?authkey=Gv1sRgCLaWp4qM-b_sqwE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts
Juan, you've been giving my Spanish dictionary a workout with these posts. Por eso digo "gracias"! That filed rod really takes the cake.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
4,507 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yes the filed rod is the icing... You don't know how funny you feel when you pull an one owner, mostly unbeaten, original lacquer VI outta the case and see those butt ugly screws and filed rods here and there... it's sickening :mrgreen:
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
4,507 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thats some serious resto work happening there mate.
Thanks man!

Why would anyone spend the time to put all that crap on there?
Don't know... I gotta think he think it was for the better. Otherwise... in any case it makes my blood boil.

Trying to emulate Emilio Lyons?
You'll get a kick out of seeing the guy that did the hackin'. Looks like emilio, talks like emilio, behaves like emilio... and the pads.... man... I wish we had good decking paint, at least it would be an improvement over the ratskin this guy uses :mrgreen: He's into his 90's now and still "fixes" horns... I cannot tell you the horror stories behind his shop. This is just a "nuance" compared to what I've seen.

Thank heavans they found you Juan!!! What a huge job to restore....
Thans Dirk. As a matter of fact my first selmer tenor had been hacked by this same guy... that's when I decided I needed to do something about this kind of thing.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
4,507 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
as for today I could only put one more shop hour into this horn but all the molested keys has been restored.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2011, SOTW's pedantic pet rodent
Joined
·
8,322 Posts
Wow that really is a hack job.. Great photos.

How many hours is that going to take to fix? I'm guessing it could be half the worth of the horn almost (??)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
4,507 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Hey guys thanks.

Rooty, this is going to take 7/10 more days. And it's probably a quarter of what the horn's worth, or half the figure you have in mind :mrgreen:
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
3,112 Posts
Nice work Juan! Must look daunting at first to see a mess like that, but nothing that reasoning and skill (and time and effort) can't sort out!

I've never understood why some think an adjusting screw fitted to the LH2 touchpiece arm is necessary when the adjustment between LH2 and the bis key is easily done just by gently bending the LH2 touchpiece arm until the desired closure of both pads is achieved. Similarly I don't understand why some people sand the LH2 felt or glue shims to the LH2 felt to regulate it as again the adjustment is easily done by bending the key.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2011, SOTW's pedantic pet rodent
Joined
·
8,322 Posts
Rooty, this is going to take 7/10 more days. And it's probably a quarter of what the horn's worth, or half the figure you have in mind :mrgreen:
So that'll be about $50, then?

I jest, of course, Selmer-fanciers.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
4,507 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Nice work Juan! Must look daunting at first to see a mess like that, but nothing that reasoning and skill (and time and effort) can't sort out!

I've never understood why some think an adjusting screw fitted to the LH2 touchpiece arm is necessary when the adjustment between LH2 and the bis key is easily done just by gently bending the LH2 touchpiece arm until the desired closure of both pads is achieved. Similarly I don't understand why some people sand the LH2 felt or glue shims to the LH2 felt to regulate it as again the adjustment is easily done by bending the key.
Hey Chris. I don't see reason for regulators, the same way I don't like to bend keys... If I'm using natural cork I'll go the extra mile and sand and compress them bumpers to avoid bending once I've done the key fitting. If I'm using rubber based bumpers (Buna-N high durometer precise thickness rubber) I may bend a little knowing that in the event of a bumper going missing I can replace it with the exact same thickness and I wouldn't have to ajust... I didn't like rubber based products for timing and height regulation until I started making synt felt pads, and that coupled with synt regulation lasts indifenitely.

So that'll be about $50, then?

I jest, of course, Selmer-fanciers.
heheheh for $50 I wouln't put my pants on for receiving the customer :bluewink:
 

·
Distiguished SOTW Tech
Joined
·
1,545 Posts
As usual, very nice work Juan. I especially like the tone hole repair/ fill. I hate it when people put a patch over the top to cover holes. Your repair is pretty much invisible. Well done! Thanks for sharing the pictures.

Matt
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
4,507 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I finished with the metalworking and posted some more pictures. I have delacquered everything by hand (Ouch! my hands!) and now moving on to minor fitting (swedging) then preparing them (buffing, detailing) then face them hinge and pivot tubes, then lacquering. It should be lacquered and ready to assemble by the end of the week.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Do you find that it works better to do all of the metal work (dent removal, soldering, etc.) prior to delacquering? What do you use to delacquer?

Thanks!

Ethan
 

·
Distiguished SOTW Tech
Joined
·
1,545 Posts
Do you find that it works better to do all of the metal work (dent removal, soldering, etc.) prior to delacquering? What do you use to delacquer?

Thanks!

Ethan
Not trying to answer for Juan, but dent work IMO is easier to do and comes out much better when you are working with clean bare metal surfaces. I generally remove lacquer before dent work. (IF lacquer is to be removed.) It is also important to clean the instrument so that the rough dirty surface on the inside does not push through to the outer surface as you are pushing and burnishing dents out. In addition to being easier to do dent work, when you are silver soldering (as Juan did) it avoids the mess of cleaning up burned lacquer. IMO if the customer wants the lacquer taken off it is easier to do it before dents and soldering.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top