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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have recently joined this site, which seems to be the home of a wonderful community.

A dear Italian friend gave me a saxophone recently. For at least the past twenty years it had been hanging on his wall as a decorative object, its form loved by its original owner - the beloved wife of my friend. Obviously there are parts missing but it would be of great interest to both me and my friend to find out more about this instrument. Any help and suggestions would be much appreciated!

There are pictures attached, and I can post more if needed. Approximate measurements are compared with those of a MkVI bari (not mine) in the following table:

DimensionSelmer MkVIStowasser
Sax standing upright on the floor, distance from floor to centre of LH "C" hole.817mm745mm
Largest external dimension - sax standing upright on the floor, distance from floor to upper part of loop at top of instrument.1015mm950mm
Centre of RH D hole to centre of LH C hole640mm530mm


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you can contact Helen via PM here or via her site


that'd be your best bet, as she along with her association with Pete Hales and @Uwe Steinmetz would be the brain trust most likely to succeed in digging up some info about this horn.

About as old as a baritone can get, and interesting name of the maker "Giuseppe Stowasser", lol....in Verona, no less....
 

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@Toots


Stowasser is a family which came to Italy from the Czech Republic. They had a factory in Verona which later on , I think, became the Desidera Leonildo ( e figli) and sons factory

There is a Hungarian Stowasser branch of the Family which produced Tarogatos too. A Walter Stowasser had a clarinet company in Bolzano-Bozen (Italy Alto Adige) it isn’t clear whether they made clarinets or assembled clarinets made in Verona. Ignaz Stowasser had a factory in Vienna they made Many wind instruments too.

Your Bariton is probably high pitch. It has a very simple systenm and shows the so called “ ministeriale” features of a short range saxophone which was very common in many European countries among which Italy.

Here some references to the Stowasser history

“...W. Stowasser's Söhne is a very old brand in the production of musical instruments. Their family history in this field can be traced back to 1770.¹ Wenzel - the "W" in W. Stowasser's Söhne - began his career as a brass manufacturer in 1824 in Graslitz, and continued until his death in 1860. After his father's death, his sons Josef, Julius and Richard continued as Söhne of W. Stowasser. From Graslitz they extend their business to Verona, Buenos Aires and Barcelona.Catania, Hamburg, Naples, New York, Riga, Sao Paulo, Sofia and Warsaw...."


from Emanuele Raganato


“From 1899, Wenzel Stowasser was the best known craftsman in Verona, and he was the descendant of generations of Bohemian musical craftsmen. He had established a business in what was then called via Magenta, a suburb of Verona, producing excellent saxophones. By 1900, when a number of local bands were using this instrument, many independent craftsmen began to work under contract to the big companies to help meet the demand for new saxophones. ..."


The Stowasser factory made a Contrabass played by Scott Robinson (it has the same brace as yours)



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a similar sax was sold on catawiki not long ago made €150 which is , I think more or less what your is worth too




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Well, when it comes to that OP’s is probably an High Pitch horn ( besides missing keys) and these things are worth whatever people decide to pay for them.

There isn’t a “ market” price for anything like these, the one on Catawiki will also , most probably, end up on a wall, whether with keys or not, they are simply “ of interest” but practically there aren’t worth even remotely considering repairing them (if not to prove that you can resuscitate them).

The contrabass was an entire different thing, rare as it is ANY contrabass is worth reviving
 

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another thing for future reference

Stowasser as a Brandname is owned by AMATI (they must have bought one of the factories probably in Graslitz Kraslice where the original family came from)

They have NOTHING to do with these Italian Stowasser strain

Here you see the Italian royal coat of arms ( Savoia family) , next to the Austrian

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you @milandro for the research and interesting information!

The sold sax you mention does look very similar, although it's attributed to W.Stowasser sohne (sons) rather than Guiseppe, and at a different address in Verona (via Mentana instead of Piazza Broilo). I wonder which one came first. Searching Google books I came across some Italian commercial yearbooks (Annuario d'Italia) with the following results in Verona, unfortunately none with the Piazza Broilo address:

1889 : Stowasser Vinceslao e figlio, via San Cosimo, 5
1896 : Stowasser W. Soehne, via Stella, 19
1905 : Stowasser W. sohne - Verona
1933 : Stowasser JR di Giuseppe Stowasser, via Mentana, 24, Stowasser W sohne Soc. Av., v.Mentana (in liquidation)
1938 : Stowasser Giuseppe fu Giuseppe, strumenti musicali, via Mentana 24
1941 : Stowasser e sohne, via Mentana 20-22

Thanks also to @JfW. In addition to everything else I was told that a crook for a high-pitch instrument would likely be expensive as it probably would need to be specially made.
 
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