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I have an old tenor with engraving on the bell saying American Professional. The serial # is 7705. Anyone know anything about this brand/sax? Any info at all would be appreciated. Pictures are at http://flickr.com/photos/americanprosax/
 

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Judging by some old threads, it is probably a Martin stencil.. but don't quote me on it.
 

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Looks earlyish - say late 20s. King made an American Standard, Holton made a professional. Keywork is largely reminiscent of Martin, but then there are significant similarities between many makes. However, the Eb spoon key is very much Buescher.

Take your pick!
 

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Adoeak: Welcome to SOTW. The split bell pads tell me 1920's. The real manufacturer is unknown to me, although all of the American makers of that era made stencils for other labels, as far as I know. DAVE
 

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Any idea of what its worth?

How much is it worth, if anything?
 

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I wouldn't imagine it is worth much. The same horn bearing the real maker's name (like Buescher, Conn, Martin, etc.) would be worth a little more, but even then, not much.

Anyone who buys something like that should figure in the cost of a full overhaul (around $500 to $700, +/-) so that detracts even more from an old horn like that. Yes, there ARE some very nice old horns from that era (I own several) and with some judicious buying, someone could make it into a player, I'm sure.

I'd guess $100 to $200 for yours, but I am no expert on pricing vintage stencil saxophones.

By the way, does your saxophone have any marking on the back by the serial number that reads, "Low Pitch" or "LP"? It probably should, from that era. If not, and the horn is a HIGH PITCH model, it would have almost no value other than some restaurant looking for a wall-hanger (or a lamp-maker, etc., etc.). DAVE
 

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Taking another look:
Split bell keys - 1920s
Front F key - later 1920s
Spoon key (Eb) - Buescher
Rounded G# key - 1930s Martins!

I have checked photos of Conn, King, Martin, Buescher and Holton and can't figure it, although stencils can send out mixed signals.

The other point to check is the length: you need to check, if you haven't already, whether it is keyed in Bb or C.

Condition is poor. A Dave says, value will be very low.
 

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Looks like a 20's Buescher stencil to me...it's got all the signs.
 

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Looks like a 20's Buescher stencil to me...it's got all the signs.
That's right.

When the Couturier-related 'Artist' series expired 1929/1930, Lyon & Healy ordered for a short period of time Buescher saxophones. The term 'American Professional' was used for L&H's second line (own make) and for stencils (origin Buescher) as well. This tenor corresponds to Buescher's late True Tone series in a downgraded version (G# without roller) and old style Buescher joint rings.
 
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