Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just finished playing our jazz concert, and I played my clarinet solo on Glenn Miller's Moonlight Serenade. Honestly I was relaxed and confident on the solo but when I got up my stomach felt like I got stabbed and my neck hurt. I was nervous, but I didn't think I was that nervous. Is that normal?

The solo was good though, at least.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Logician
Joined
·
27,250 Posts
When performing, it's always good to think of all the people watching and listening to everything you do and how if you screw up everyone will know and talk about it for some time to come... and then thrive upon it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,336 Posts
Performance anxiety (butterflies) is entirely normal. It does diminish for most people over time the more they solo in public. One thing that can help is to "over learn" your part or the piece you are playing. That means going over it again and again after it is mastered with accuracy. That way when the nervousness starts, the reflexes can take over and help to have a good performance.

One trick I learned much later in life was to be totally prepared, and then at the performance to mentally "let go" and let the music happen instead of trying so hard to make it perfect. It always seems to come off better when I stop trying and just enjoy the music.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member.
Joined
·
2,090 Posts
The simple answer, yes. I believe many performers, in all fields, experience performance anxiety (stage fright) throughout their careers, which usually dissipates once the performance begins.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2010-2016
Joined
·
1,708 Posts
I'm generally OK until I notice someone in the audience I know from my other lives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Happens to me too, less so now, funny because I regularly give talks to groups of 200-500 people without any symptoms, only while performing musically. First time in many years I performed last year and was distracted to the point that didn't do simple checks for sticking C# and G#, bloody G# stuck and buggered up the first solo. Remember to err is human...though to bugger up in front of a crowd is amusing for many
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
4,507 Posts
Yes, but if you're going to play that way, make sure you practice that way. :bluewink:
well that's the point... that's why nobody walks right with pants wrapped around ankles... lack of practice :mrgreen:
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
Joined
·
4,881 Posts
Everyone gets nervous. I was so nervous in college that I never heard anything at all during those measures of my solo(s). TWO YEARS! It took me a long time to be relaxed enough to actually be able to listen, hear, count, and play at the same time during solos. Now I am fine and almost ALWAYS take the first solo of the night.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Glad to see I'm not the only one. The weirdest thing was I wasn't nervous at all but my stomach still hurt when I stood up. Oh well.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,484 Posts
Yup! Very normal to be somewhat to very nervous. Some people exhibit nervousness differently. For some, it takes longer, if ever, to completely overcome the nervousness.

Then there are those who don't seem to have any issues with stage fright/nervousness - they revel in the spotlight. That is a state most of us dream of, hope for, and work towards attaining.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2010-2016
Joined
·
1,708 Posts
Wow! You must be some kisser!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW member/, Official SOTW Sister
Joined
·
19,586 Posts
You're in good company kid. LOTS of performers get the pre-performance jitters. :)

OOPS...Post-performance jitters too!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
2,355 Posts
It's different for everybody I guess, some people have a drink or smoke a J to take off the edge a bit.
You've got to know your limits very well though with booze or other stuff. Otherwise that will be extremely counterproductive.:(
There's a story of a well known and highly regarded actor here in Holland who ( after a long and succesfull career) still is so nervous he throws up in the dressing room before a premiere. And then goes on stage to do a very good job. :shock:
For horn players and singers it is a big issue not to let it affect the breathing. Do some long tones and /or breathing exercises if possible before you go on stage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,912 Posts
When performing, it's always good to think of all the people watching and listening to everything you do and how if you screw up everyone will know and talk about it for some time to come... and then thrive upon it.
I agree with this. You've worked very hard to get to the point you're at. Revel in every moment, because as long as you play well, you're the s***! And THAT is how you meet chicks and get laid.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top