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I do understand the principle behind this approach. If the adhesive holding a pad in a keycup is weak enough to allow the pad to be pulled out with a finger nail, there is a strong likelihood that most if not all the pads were installed that poorly. Something my mentor told me to do when doing "play conditions" was to try to make the corks and felts come off. I asked him why and he said that if they had a tendency to come off it is better for it to happen while the instrument is on the bench rather than after the customer takes it home. This not only saves the customer's time not having to bring it back, but it saves the shop's reputation as well.
I get what you are saying but there are two types of clients. One who just wants to get up and running for the least amount of money possible and the other which is a serious player who cant afford a failure and can afford to properly service their instrument or a full repad when recommended. The horns I own put me in the first category and if I did a full repad it would be like throwing good money after bad. If one cant afford to service a "nice" horn it dosent make sense to buy one. I will eventually get a "desirable" horn and add the cost of a full overhaul in my budget so I dont have to piece repairs together and start fresh the right way. A skilled techs time is worth the money for sure.

Question.... in your opinion as a tech which pads are you replacing most frequently?
 

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Question.... in your opinion as a tech which pads are you replacing most frequently?
I probably shouldn't be answering since I'm not a tech, but just from my own experience as a player, the upper stack pads (left hand) usually need replacing more frequently. And that makes sense since they are more prone to moisture. But the techs on here can either verify or correct that statement.
 

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I get what you are saying but there are two types of clients. One who just wants to get up and running for the least amount of money possible and the other which is a serious player who cant afford a failure and can afford to properly service their instrument or a full repad when recommended. The horns I own put me in the first category and if I did a full repad it would be like throwing good money after bad. If one cant afford to service a "nice" horn it dosent make sense to buy one. I will eventually get a "desirable" horn and add the cost of a full overhaul in my budget so I dont have to piece repairs together and start fresh the right way. A skilled techs time is worth the money for sure.
There is another approach to consider when doing "just make it play" repairs or play conditions. A tech can just fix the issues present and replace the pads that must be replaced, or the tech can go to the next level and replace pads that look like they will probably not last another year. In other words do some "preventative maintenance" in addition to what is currently in need of repair. It is comparable to the inspection and service auto makers recommend after so many thousand miles.

Question.... in your opinion as a tech which pads are you replacing most frequently?
That typically includes the palm key pads, and the low Eb---sometimes high E or F#. They are the toneholes that get and collect the most water and/or crud blown into the saxophone. Some techs replace these automatically as part of a "refresh" play condition.
 

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This all presumes of course the last person did a good overhaul whenever that was. I find the lower stack F key often isn't sealing quite right, isn't in synch with the lower stack E and D, and isn't corresponding perfectly with the upper stack BIS.
 

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This all presumes of course the last person did a good overhaul whenever that was. I find the lower stack F key often isn't sealing quite right, isn't in synch with the lower stack E and D, and isn't corresponding perfectly with the upper stack BIS.
That is the most "sensitive" area on a saxophone to regulate since there are so many keys that must operate together. It is also the area that goes out of regulation most often. I rarely do a "play condition" that does not include the words "adjust and regulate" on the repair ticket.
 

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This all presumes of course the last person did a good overhaul whenever that was.
This also brings up a point that I don't think has been made yet on this thread. Again, in my experience as a player who over the years has had a couple of overhauls on my horn(s), I've noticed that once a top-quality overhaul has been done, if you have your tech do annual or even biannual (a lot depends on how much you play the horn) minor maintenance, you won't have to do a total pad change or overhaul again for a very, very long time. And, more importantly, the horn will play very well. You can depend on it.
 

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This all presumes of course the last person did a good overhaul whenever that was. I find the lower stack F key often isn't sealing quite right, isn't in synch with the lower stack E and D, and isn't corresponding perfectly with the upper stack BIS.
That's an adjustment/timing issue that is not related to a bad pad. It can be one of those things that sneak in as the soft materials compress.
 

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This all presumes of course the last person did a good overhaul whenever that was. I find the lower stack F key often isn't sealing quite right, isn't in synch with the lower stack E and D, and isn't corresponding perfectly with the upper stack BIS.
Sometimes the F key not sealing well can be because the it is over regulated to the f# key or G# key, it doesn't take much for it to go out of regulation
 

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My selmer 164 tenor is about 50 years old. Gets played about 12 hours a week.
Half of that is outside every weekend.
Got lucky I guess. about six years ago and found a very qualified technician who is a high school band school teacher (bari player) who repairs my horn.
My last visit he replaced 5 pads and charged me 75 bucks 😎....
After reading some of the posts I think I just got lucky.
 
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