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Discussion Starter #1
Hey my fellow horn players! I'm new here and I'm wondering if any of you know a website where they have free saxophone scales in all keys for the alto and tenor. I don't have a soprano yet so im not that worried about soprano scales yet, but I desperately need alto and tenor scales!!

Thank you for your help!
 

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saxshed.com is one of several sites that offer free instruciton tools, start there
 

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melmartin.com is another useful site
 

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If you're doing scales in all 12 keys, why does it need to be instrument specific? It's the same on each horn.
 

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Agent27 said:
If you're doing scales in all 12 keys, why does it need to be instrument specific? It's the same on each horn.
I was about to point that out.

The fingerings for all the saxes are the same. The only difference is the key they are pitched in. The fingerings for the all of the scales are the same on every horn. The notes that you actually hear will be the same on soprano and tenor (pitched in Bb), and alto will be seperate (Eb).
 

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First off, Welcome to SOTW.

Secondly, how many times do you plan on posting this question?
 

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Agent27 said:
If you're doing scales in all 12 keys, why does it need to be instrument specific? It's the same on each horn.
Not only that, they are the same scales, regardless of instrument, once you have transposed. A C major scale is a C major scale. No such thing as a "saxophone scale." Now, you do have to transpose from concert pitch:

For tenor, move up a whole step: C concert = D on tenor.

For alto move down a minor third, or 3 half steps: C concert = A on alto.

But you only have to do this when playing with others or reading off a chart in concert key.

Get any theory book and all the important scales will be in there (I'm sure you can also find them easily on the internet--try google). Then play and memorize them, so you can play them without reading off a page. Most importantly, start with the major scales in all keys! Every other conceivable scale can be derived from the major scale and will be easy to learn, once you know the 12 major scales.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
JL said:
Not only that, they are the same scales, regardless of instrument, once you have transposed. A C major scale is a C major scale. No such thing as a "saxophone scale." Now, you do have to transpose from concert pitch:

For tenor, move up a whole step: C concert = D on tenor.

For alto move down a minor third, or 3 half steps: C concert = A on alto.

But you only have to do this when playing with others or reading off a chart in concert key.

Get any theory book and all the important scales will be in there (I'm sure you can also find them easily on the internet--try google). Then play and memorize them, so you can play them without reading off a page. Most importantly, start with the major scales in all keys! Every other conceivable scale can be derived from the major scale and will be easy to learn, once you know the 12 major scales.
thank you I was wondering about that major scale.
 

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1. Learn all 12 chromatic scales.
2. Learn all 12 whole tone scales.
3. Learn all 12 symmetric diminished scales.
 
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