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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is the series II alto an improved version of the series I ?

Price for series I cheaper than series II ?
 

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Certainly not! I and many others prefer the first generation SA 80's ...they still had the 'nice features' like the badge on the neck ..little details that have long gone due to cost cutting and 'rationalisation' whatever that is! some of the alto's especially are real killers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Certainly not! I and many others prefer the first generation SA 80's ...they still had the 'nice features' like the badge on the neck ..little details that have long gone due to cost cutting and 'rationalisation' whatever that is! some of the alto's especially are real killers.
So ,at least the same price of higher ?
 

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Certainly not! I and many others prefer the first generation SA 80's ...they still had the 'nice features' like the badge on the neck ..little details that have long gone due to cost cutting and 'rationalisation' whatever that is! some of the alto's especially are real killers.
The neck badge is not "long gone" from the Series II alto. It's still on the current horns, including the Jubilee series.

The Series III alto doesn't have the neck emblem, but I assume that doesn't matter to the OP. The "Series I" and Series II are much closer to each other than to the Series III.
 

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So ,at least the same price of higher ?
The issue here is rarity, not quality. Used Series II altos are in plentiful supply, whereas the "Series I" horns were made for only a few years. It is much easier to find a Series II alto in whatever condition you prefer -- from barely playable all the way to mechanically and cosmetically superb -- than to find a good "Series I" alto. With the Series II, you can shop around to find a used horn that fits your needs and your budget. With the "Series I," you are more at the mercy of the market.

For example, here's a good "Series I" on Reverb for about $2900: https://reverb.com/item/11069484-se...hJLT2gIVhIuzCh3k-QpaEAQYBCABEgJuzfD_BwE&pla=1. It's not difficult to find an excellent Series II for less than that (I have one that I will be selling shortly). You also can find a Series II that costs more, especially if it's a Jubilee edition.
 

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Some might argue that the Series II is an improvement because of the slight key modifications that removed the high pearl key and reshaped the high F# key. I would argue that the greatest improvement would be to get a tenor instead of an alto.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
saxophone, flutes and lil' bit of clarinet
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Selmer certainly thought that the series ii was an improvement. Many players agree.
 

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The SA80 could be seen as a transitional horn. AFAIK, the SII mainly consisted in mechanical improvements (front F, bow assembly, screws and springs, etc...) applied over the SA80. It might suggest improved playability and serviceability, but no big change in terms of sound and intonation. As altos, both are excellent horns anyway. I’d go with either if it is in good shape.
 

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I have a strong preference for the Series I alto and would likely buy a Series I tenor if a good opportunity presented itself. My Series I is my main horn, which relegated my Series II to backup status.
 

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The bottom line is that these are all professional quality horns, among the best ever made. If you're looking to buy a horn to play, any Selmer Paris horn would be a good choice, provided that the horn is in playing shape (in regulation, not leaky, doesn't need a re-pad, etc.) Each model in the Selmer line has their fans and detractors, as with every other brand.

If you are looking to buy something collectible as an investment, then it's an entirely different criteria. I think LostConn did a nice job of explaining the driver there - scarcity tends to drive prices up, assuming there is demand for the item in the first place.
 

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I'll take a pearl front-F any day over the metal teardrop thing.
Why? There was a flat, button-style front F on a YTS-61 I used to play, and I found it inferior to the various shaped front F keys on the other saxes I've owned (Selmer, Keilwerth, and a couple of different key shapes from Yanagisawa). A button-style pearl basically forces you to lift your index finger and place it back down on the front F. Most ergonomically shaped front F keys enable you to reduce the lifting to a bare minimum, or none at all, by just rolling the side of your index finger upward to hit the key. This is very helpful in rapid passages going from C to high F, or indeed from almost any left-hand note to high F.
 
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