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Discussion Starter #1
For as long as I can remember, Meyer mouthpieces have made most of the alto sax players that I've known salivate. At a certain point, I was drinking the juice as well. I had a "Limited Edition New York" Meyer mouthpiece that Theo Wanne worked on. I can honestly say that it was probably the best mouthpiece that I've ever owned for Alto. At the time, I just couldn't handle it, so I sold it (BIG mistake). Several years of searching for a quality mouthpiece go by and I acquire a Meyer Brothers mpc that was worked on by JVW. But since I mainly play tenor it seems as though I'm not used to the chamber of a Meyer. I go back and forth from the MBros to an EB Otto Link HR to a Lamberson depending on the situation. It seems to me that Meyers have been the ONLY mouthpiece where I find the chamber is the problem. What's up with that?

Part two: There are a TON of mouthpiece makers out there who are making copies of Meyers for everyone to buy on Alto. Although the rubber/craftsmanship may be excellent, there are those of us who just aren't comfortable on a Meyer. Where's the variety? I know that on tenor Otto link is the most copied mouthpiece, but they blow totally different. I also recognize that there are some copies of soloists out there. They might not be for everyone either. Thanks for reading through this rant, everyone. I would LOVE to hear your thoughts on this one.

All the best,

Jared
 

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Discussion Starter #3
All of the mouthpieces are around the same tip opening (.78). They all have a similar attack and intonation. It could just be me, but the Meyers have a responsive/easy to blow tip and baffle, but meet with resistance when the air reaches the chamber. I've tries tons of mouthpieces. I find this problem only with Meyers. I think it's the way the chamber's shaped.
 

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All of the mouthpieces are around the same tip opening (.78).
There's more to the equation than just tip opening and chamber though.

I kind of feel the same about Meyers. I used one for a while just because at that time every did (a bit like MK VIs) and a lot of my work was as a lead alto player. But I then experimented and found that I could still play lead on a Lawton, but it was also good for a lot of other stuff. Since then I've used a Soloist and a Vandoren Java. I kept going back to the Meyer (which I had refaced by Jon Van Wie), but it never quite did it for me and I now have just settled down with an RPC. I'm not even going to make PPTs for alto as there is no need, I'm happy with the RPC.
 

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A tried many alto Meyers, over years (decades...) they never made it for me. I was really wondering why they were so much praised. Until recently. Keeping trying them whenever I could, I picked one from a local shop, among their used mouthpieces. That was the one. A plain 7M. I have no clue why THIS specific one does it. I suspect my embouchure/support to have changed, don't know.
I also had the surprise yesterday, while sorting all my alto mps, to stumble over a standard Selmer F which just does great, including the high register and altissimo, which I always found quite dead on the Selmers. No clue...
 

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All of the mouthpieces are around the same tip opening (.78). They all have a similar attack and intonation. It could just be me, but the Meyers have a responsive/easy to blow tip and baffle, but meet with resistance when the air reaches the chamber. I've tries tons of mouthpieces. I find this problem only with Meyers. I think it's the way the chamber's shaped.
I think this is most likely due to facing issues (which are difficult to see by eye) and not chamber shape differemnces (which you can see by eye). It is human nature to try to assign cause and effect to what you can see.
 

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selling my ny meyer for 100$ was one of my worst mistakes . it played lights out. it just sang. didnt think i would ever play alto again-boy was i wrong as its all i play now. i have 2 early babbits -decent but dont feel the same.
 

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Hi saxyjare1.I have been playing a N.Y. hard ribber 6m alto piece for a Long Time. Have tried many others and NEVER found one to be better.I has warmth , flexibility, "bite" and you name it They are rare becdause they stopped making them long ago.Never played a new one, but they can't be all bad-- they are a Meyer. I use a metal Link (Florida) on tenor and Have played drawers of others(madenning) and just keep on having fun with these two m.p.'s Good luck. Rustyreed.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks, rustyreed! It's always nice to hear that someone out there has settled in to something that's comfortable. :) I try not to go completely crazy with mouthpieces even though I trade from time to time. Although, I'd love to get a Freddie Gregory HR piece for tenor. For alto, I'll keep my meyer bros. around and give it another try!
 

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All of the mouthpieces are around the same tip opening (.78). They all have a similar attack and intonation. It could just be me, but the Meyers have a responsive/easy to blow tip and baffle, but meet with resistance when the air reaches the chamber. I've tries tons of mouthpieces. I find this problem only with Meyers. I think it's the way the chamber's shaped.
I don't know if I'm alone in being confused by this. I don't see how you can say that the tip and baffle are responsive but the chamber is not. To me, when it comes to blowing, it's all one mouthpiece and it's either responsive or not (or somewhere in between). I don't have any sort of sensation of different responsiveness in different parts of the mouthpiece (though of course the different parts of the mouthpiece would contribute to the overall responsiveness). Maybe I'm missing something?
 

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Have you heard of Gilad Atzmon on a Morgan Fry alto Meyer style copy, you might change your mind.
 

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Meyers never did it for me either, thank goodness I fell on a Selmer soloist D and now awaiting my 2nd Mouthpiece Cafe expresso. My new puppy really loved my first one but didn't really know how to look after it!
 

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For as long as I can remember, Meyer mouthpieces have made most of the alto sax players that I've known salivate. At a certain point, I was drinking the juice as well. I had a "Limited Edition New York" Meyer mouthpiece that Theo Wanne worked on. I can honestly say that it was probably the best mouthpiece that I've ever owned for Alto. At the time, I just couldn't handle it, so I sold it (BIG mistake). Several years of searching for a quality mouthpiece go by and I acquire a Meyer Brothers mpc that was worked on by JVW. But since I mainly play tenor it seems as though I'm not used to the chamber of a Meyer. I go back and forth from the MBros to an EB Otto Link HR to a Lamberson depending on the situation. It seems to me that Meyers have been the ONLY mouthpiece where I find the chamber is the problem. What's up with that?

Part two: There are a TON of mouthpiece makers out there who are making copies of Meyers for everyone to buy on Alto. Although the rubber/craftsmanship may be excellent, there are those of us who just aren't comfortable on a Meyer. Where's the variety? I know that on tenor Otto link is the most copied mouthpiece, but they blow totally different. I also recognize that there are some copies of soloists out there. They might not be for everyone either. Thanks for reading through this rant, everyone. I would LOVE to hear your thoughts on this one.

All the best,

Jared
Jared,

Meyers are the standard for alto just like Links are the standard for tenor. I guess this happened because they were around before anyone else and they gave players a sound that fit the style of music being played during that time. I'm not sure what you mean by a "ton" of makers copying Meyers because I only know of a handful.

Anyway, getting back to the issue at hand. When I came out with my first hard rubber alto mouthpiece what I did was looked at Meyers since they were the gold standard and then redesigned it to take out the parts that people didn't like about it and that is the baffle is too high around the tip area which was probably done intentionally as music got louder and players started playing off the horn more.

Meyer's aren't exactly too bright, they're whiney which is almost the same thing. So, my rendition has a lower baffle the result is much better. The only problem with doing that it the high notes (above high F) get a little harder to play so the person playing has to know what he's doing but the positive side is that the low notes are easier and the upper register is fatter. A softer reed is also suggested or a more lively reed like a Rico Jazz Select. Good luck in your search.

Phil Barone
 

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I won't say I've played "many" mouthpieces (alto) in my life but a good handful. Personally I'm looking for that full, dark, deep, rich vintage sound and I find the best fit for myself is what might be considered the most popular alto mouthpiece of all time, a New York Meyer 5 medium chamber. At first the mouthpiece did seem a little whiney as stated above. But after just a few hours of adjusting I was able to completely tame and fill up the mouthpiece which began producing a sound that I was very surprised by. Don't get me wrong, the initial sound is excellent but after a little playing you really go "Wow!" At least this was my case. And the NY Meyer 5 that I have acquired just seems to have this magic to the ease and feel of playing. No other mouthpiece that I have played comes close.

I have played Brilhart Ebolin 5*, E. Rousseau SJ8 (big opening, but worked well), Selmer's line of mouthpieces, German Spezial, Theo Wanne, and standard Meyer U.S.A mouthpieces. I even ventured into the land of Yamaha mouthpieces, but nothing plays just like the NY Meyer. For a while I did play a Meyer U.S.A. 9 with a small chamber that didn't feel like the NY Meyer but had a close sound. This mouthpiece did not feel anything as open as a 9 should and the sound was not what you'd expect from a 9!! Maybe someone has an explanation or theory as to why this is?
 

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Let me say that I am a Meyer "returnee" Having been bitten by GAS, I ventured into a metal Dukoff 7 for my YAS 82ZB. After a few hours of playing, I realized that my sax sounds better when I use the Meyer than the Dukoff.
 

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On that note, why aren't STMs the defacto on Alto--or the opposite, why isn't a Meyer the defacto on tenor? I've always liked how STM sounds on Alto's. Do people not like the sound of STMs on Alto in general?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Phil: Thanks for the words. It gives me something to think about.

sugaki: I've heard some guys sound awesome on an STM on Alto. Didn't Sonny Stitt play on one for a time? Right now, I'm loving the Early Babbitt on alto.
 
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