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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello ! My name is Nikita . My English is poor...:cry: I hope you understand me :) I really love Eric Marienthal and want to achieve the same ''light'' high notes as his .
My high notes sound narrow :( When attacking, my high notes are sometimes not taken. They sound in the first octave. I relax my throat and lips. I think in the video everything will be clear. I play a note Fa the third octave. At the beginning I press, then in a relaxed state.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kQFts-g3VA&feature=youtu.be
 

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Can you post a video of you playing a chromatic scale low Bb to high F# and back down at a moderate tempo?
 

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Ok. Looks like you have a lot of tension in your whole body and it gets tighter and tighter (especially the embouchure) as you go up. Hard to tell...one lesson with a good teacher would be more helpful than 50 responses to this post. You need to work on attack and simply relaxing while you play. The best way to get fluent in the high range is overtones, longtones, and playing melodies up there. If you’re doing it wrong, you will develop bad habits...lessons, please.
 

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I would say work on your tone (air support, articulation, etc) in the normal register until you get it under control before even thinking about venturing into the altissimo range. And yes, getting some lessons would be a great idea.
 

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Hi Nikita, and welcome to the forum!

It looks like you are probably just beginning your journey with the sax. It's good that you have found Sax on the Web: you can find a lot of great information and advice here. But I hope you have also found a good teacher who can work with you in person on regular basis. That's probably going to be more helpful than the general advice you will get on a forum like this.

Watching your video, it looks like you need to work on controlling you air stream. There are different ways to do this, but most of us would agree that working on long tones is a must for young players. There are a lot of different long tone exercises: if you search "long tones for saxophone" on YouTube, you'll see numerous examples. Choose an exercise that you like, and do it every day. Over time, your tone will get better and you'll start to get the sound you're hearing in your head. Good luck, have fun, be patient!
 

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Hi Nikita,

Welcome to the forum :) I have a few comments...

1) You need to find a teacher, this will get you on the right track. That should be your goal to nice light high notes.
2) The note you are playing in the first video is not an altissimo note, it is called a palm key note, and is part of the "normal" range of the instrument.
3) It's obvious from your videos that you are pinching your embouchure as you go higher up the horn. This is a bad idea for a number of reasons. You might try a slightly harder reed (like 1/2 step harder - a 2 1/2 instead of a 2, for example).
4) The real key to embouchure relaxation is breath support (this is why you need a teacher!) Make sure you are supporting the air from your belly (diaphragm) rather than just using normal air. It should be a light workout to play a wind instrument :)

When you do decide to move to the altissimo, the best way to do that is play overtones. People have suggested long tones - that's fine, but I would suggest playing some overtones too. For example, finger low B or Bb, and try to make the instrument play 1 octave higher. Once you can do that easily (without changing your embouchure!!!) then make your horn play F (fingering low Bb) or F# (low B). Eventually you will be able to play a full range of overtones. Make sure your embouchure is relaxed, and have good breath support, the only changes you make to change pitch are inside your mouth with tongue position and throat position.

Good luck, and do keep us posted on your progress!
 

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Make sure your embouchure is relaxed, and have good breath support...
There is a lot of good info in this thread, but this is especially key.
 

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2) The note you are playing in the first video is not an altissimo note, it is called a palm key note, and is part of the "normal" range of the instrument.
Yes. I realized this after what I posted above about holding off on the altissimo range until gaining facility and good tone in the normal range. I guess the OP is confusing altissimo with the palm key notes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Friends, thank you for your support! Thanks for your advice :) On the video, I was worried, so I tensed up (
In the summer, I want to study under the direction of Eric Marienthal at artistworks.com. Has anyone practiced this? How is the learning process going on? Tell me, please) Thank you very much!
 

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I will rewrite the video with altissimo
I'm a bit confused about what you are asking. Are you talking about the palm key notes (up to F3) in the 'third octave', which are in the normal range, or are you asking us about altissimo notes (above F3)? If you are looking for advice on the altissimo range, I'd restate the fact that you want to get a solid embouchure, strong air stream, and good control of your sound/tone quality in the normal range first, before worrying about altissimo. Especially on alto.
 

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I am curious too. I am working on Altissimo notes on Alto and Tenor but to no luck either. On alto I can pop out a G/A but on Tenor nothing. Ab never comes out and Bb is out of the question.
 

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Haven't seen the videos, since they've been removed, but I'd like to point out a possible source of confusion may be the word "altissimo" itself, which in many languages means simply that it's the very high range, so it would be normal for a new student to assume that the palm keys at the top of their fingering chart are the altissimo range. For nikitasax, in case you're still here, when we use the word "altissimo" for the saxophone, we specifically mean the range higher than high F or F#.

clarinetshinobi: The advice here is solid. For me, personally, range in the altissimo is easier on tenor, but control is harder... mainly because I don't really practice tenor. What I do find is that practicing overtones on the low fingerings of the tenor help me dramatically with establishing control over the altissimo, so give that a shot.
 
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