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Discussion Starter #1
I have been practising altissimo on alto sax.

I also tried playing altissimo on a friend's instrument. It was much harder to blow, say, F#.

What does this indicate? That my sax is of better quality? Or should my friend take his instrument to a technician?
 

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there is the possibility that the way the front F opens is not the ideal height on your friend’s saxophone but much of the altissimo depends on how you produce harmonics.

Assuming that your friend has no problem to produce altissimo then it is likely that he is used to his horn while you aren’t.
Some horns play altissimo easily and others are more picky and require getting used to it. Besides, some players never play any altissimo and never discover that said regulation of the front or quick F is off.
 

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Different horn, different deal. Learn to play your horn and don't worry about any others.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
there is the possibility that the way the front F opens is not the ideal height on your friend’s saxophone but much of the altissimo depends on how you produce harmonics.

Assuming that your friend has no problem to produce altissimo then it is likely that he is used to his horn while you aren’t.
Some horns play altissimo easily and others are more picky and require getting used to it. Besides, some players never play any altissimo and never discover that said regulation of the front or quick F is off.
Thanks Milandro. Yes, the height when the front F opens is not the ideal height. The same goes for F sharp.
 

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well, ultra modern horns the opening of front F is adjustable but on older horns this has to be regulated cutting cork or felt to the desired opening.

On the other hand you can also adjust the fingering of the notes with alternative fingering.
 

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well, ultra modern horns the opening of front F is adjustable but on older horns this has to be regulated cutting cork or felt to the desired opening.

On the other hand you can also adjust the fingering of the notes with alternative fingering.
Thanks for the update. Out of curiosity, what does older horns mean? Before 2000?
 

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I think ( but I may be wrong It is not a detail that I have ever paid too much attention to) before the '80 no horn had front F regulated by screws.
 

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I think ( but I may be wrong It is not a detail that I have ever paid too much attention to) before the '80 no horn had front F regulated by screws.
Actually, I had an old Dolnet where you loosened the arm that the front F key bore on, and slid it up or down to increase or decrease the amount of opening. I don't think I've ever seen another one like it.
 

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It is always possible, there were always some specially advanced models but I think that the general use of screws to regulate the front F is rather modern.
 

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Different horn, different deal. Learn to play your horn and don't worry about any others.
+1

I have 2 tenors, different brands and both are their pro models. Getting altissimo on each feels different, and different fingerings work better on each as well.
 
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