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Hi all,

I have recently started playing bari in a big band and am looking to play some killer solos. This is where my question pops up: altissimo on the bari? I know it's possible as I've seen it done, but does anyone have any tips/tricks or fingering charts to give me a hand?

Cheers
 

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Do you have any of the standard altissimo books like E Rousseau's Saxophone High Tones, Nash Studies in High Harmonics, or Rascher Top Tones for Saxophone?

Any of these should prove helpful, along with working on the standard overtone studies like used in Allard based studies. I know the Rousseau book has fingering charts, but there are plenty of those as it seems each instrument will have some fingerings that work better than others...

I actually thought the altissimo was a little easier on bari, when I used to play the beast.

Shawn
 

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Check out Robert Lucky's book "Saxophone Altissimo." It's an extremely thorough book on altissimo production, has a lot of great overtone exercises and dozens of regular and alternate fingerings for each horn.

I have used his overtone series exercises as a warmup for years.
 

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I would defintely suggest the E Rousseau book. I find it to be very helpful and the fingerings in there seem to work pretty well. Also try doing some overtones if you haven't tried that yet. My understanding is that overtones is one of the first steps to learning the altissimo range. Good luck!
 

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Those books are all good. I might add that altissimo on baritone is, for me anyway, easier to play well than on the other saxes, probably in ascending order. In other words, soprano is much the hardest to achieve - and the least desirable too, happily. Listen to Ronnie Cuber's stuff - he's often "up there"!
 

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I actually found altissimo to be second-most difficult to play on Bari (an was impossible for me on Soprano), but is very possible, and managable after some serious work with overtones and working different fingering charts.

I wish I could afford another Bari, I haven't played one in probably 5 years....

-Bubba
 

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...but does anyone have any tips/tricks or fingering charts to give me a hand?
Yes. All the fingering charts in the world will do you no good until you learn to blow differently for the altissimo notes. You have to squeeze your airflow a bit by raising the back of your tongue up towards the roof of your mouth as you blow.
 

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What's strange is that I was able to play altissimo on soprano really quickly and the overtones came pretty quickly too, whereas on bari I am still trying to get overtones and I don't think I have played a note in the altissimo register yet!
 

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Bari is the altissimo horn!! Being bigger it has a lot of harmonics and of course many things have to do, but essentially, the bigger the horn, the larger the range. Many bari players play extremely high altissimo. I would recommend a teacher. You teach, you might follow me. You will have the fingering charts but with this horns coming from an Alto and a Soprano we better start looking to the mouthpiece and of course, is it going to be a Bb Bari or a Low A Bari. Reeds? Usually altissimo in Bari is played as for one note below. This is, if you want altissimo A, this is A3 (if this is a Bb Bari) you finger what would be a B4 for a tenor. I think a couple of lessons will help. For Baritone altissimo, an old metal Berg did miracles for a friend.
 

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I have a teacher and he is working with me on altissimo. I just got an overtone on bari for the first time the other day! But on soprano, I am a pro at overtones and got them like it was nothing. I have a low A bari. Hopefully with more practice I can get altissimo soon.
 

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As to your solos ... altissimo is not impressive in and of itself ... it can only be icing on the cake ... if everything else about your solo is groovy in every way, and you wanna pop up into some altissimo, great ... but if everything else is not extremely happening and your altissimo weak, then don't bother. Really ... it's not neccessary. You will be ready to do so when you don't have to ask it as a question...
 

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If a melody you want to play just happens to ascend beyond the "practical" range of the instrument, then so be it. But if you are looking to simply "play some high notes" for the impressiveness factor ... dont bother ... it will probably be neither high nor impressive...
 

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What's strange is that I was able to play altissimo on soprano really quickly and the overtones came pretty quickly too, whereas on bari I am still trying to get overtones and I don't think I have played a note in the altissimo register yet!
Everyone's a bit different. I haven't spent much time developing altissimo on bari, but it has been harder to be consistent with it than alto or tenor for me.
 
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