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Mods, please don't move this thread because I'm asking about Rascher setup specific fingerings. Thanks!

I need to find some altissimo fingerings. I find a lot of the modern fingerings respond or intone differently on a large chamber/vintage horn setup than they should. Also, the some of the ones in the top tones book are kind of out of date. I'm using a combination of top tones fingerings/modern ones, but I still have some notes where I can't find the perfect fingering. Any help? Some specific ones are G#3 and B4. Also, I like the fingering for C4 in the top tones book, but I find it has a tendency to drop down to Bb4 (I know, a lot is my problem, since my voicing should be a little more stable), so I'd like to find a little more stable fingering. Could you Rascher guys share what you use? Thanks.
 

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Maybe not of much help because I play tenor and I don't know the Rascher book, but I have a fingering for G#3 that works FOR ME on every horn, including my new Leblanc.
Just play G2 + side C key. I never used any other fingering. For the C4 I use two forks.
Because of the new horn I'm now looking for a nice B4 myself. (so I'll be watching this thread)
 

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I think that the best way to find altissimo fingerings is to sit down with your saxophone and a tuner, and just start pressing different buttons. Altissimo fingerings are definitely not universal across all saxophones, and in order to know the best ones for you requires you to sit down with your sax and tuner and work it out for yourself.
In addition, Rascher's fingering for G# is atrocious. It is unstable, AND has no power.
 

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I think that the best way to find altissimo fingerings is to sit down with your saxophone and a tuner, and just start pressing different buttons. Altissimo fingerings are definitely not universal across all saxophones, and in order to know the best ones for you requires you to sit down with your sax and tuner and work it out for yourself.
In addition, Rascher's fingering for G# is atrocious. It is unstable, AND has no power.
Yeah, I don't like the 2/2 one. However he provides an alternate fingering which is awkward but sounds fine.
 

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sorry dude, you're a little off on your thread. I mean, Rascher school of altissimo fingerings is dead. If YOU DO actually use any of them you are just probably making yourself work WAY too much, they don't work with modern saxophone physics.

Anyway, if you want some stuff for for G# and C, well here ya go.

For G#
You could use the fork 1 and 3 in the left hand with 1 in the right hand and the side C key.
If you have been practicing your overtones you could be ready for this one...

LH= 2,3 RH= 1, side Bb You need good voicing for this one. Its almost like a transformed A.

for C
you could use the fork in both hands. LH= 1,3 RH=1,3 with side Bb. You could make RH= 1,2 or 2,3 Depends on your embochure voicing, which is easier.

Or you could use the 3 in the left hand and side c, and the palm keys D and E.

OR...
just palm D and E by themselves.

Some of these are tough, but its the overtones that can "considerably".

Any question, just email me at [email protected] laterz
 

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Sorry dude, maybe you should rethink what you're posting. If he is asking about fingerings specific for rascher school, then he proooobably plays on an older saxophone with an older mouthpiece which definitely wouldn't be considered modern. I don't think the physics of the old saxophones have changed from back then to today. The entire point of this thread is to ask about fingerings catering towards the older equipment, not modern. Regardless, a lot of those fingerings in the top-tones book don't work very well. Some "modern" fingerings will also work on older horns with some adjustments. I find it hilarious when people wonder how people think that playing something like XAS on bueschers is impossible..... especially when it was written for the Rascher Quartet.

warp x, I was offering the fingering chart of my altissimo fingerings to zxcvbnm.

For Rascher school-style equipment...............

G# and B are definitely the ones I despise the most. 1,3 and side C is usually the one I will use the most. On some bueschers 123,4 side C and maybe side Bb if it's running flat. I can't really remember off the top of my head since I have been playing nothing but baritone for the past couple of months. I would suggest some variations on those. For B, well I use palm key D, 3 and 4 for the most part. This one you just basically have to get used to. I have found that palm key D, 12 and side C also produces a really easy B. The only problem with that one is that it's a little thin sounding, but I use it for fast leaps and really soft Bs.

Ultimately, the best way is to just fool around and figure out which fundamental you are using and then just adding keys to add resonance or timbre differences or intonation purposes. Then once you have kind of settled I would highly suggest to do long tones of your altissimo with a tuner starting as soft as you can and crescendoing to your peak volume and coming back down to a whisper with NO vibrato.
 

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The only fingerings I use from the Top Tones book are the ones from E on up, and even some of those are modified. I agree with experimenting with your instrument to find what fingerings work best for you. Some of the fingerings I've been given over the years work well, but many of the ones I've discovered on my own produce better results because they are more specific to my particular horn.
 

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this is a great website for altissimo fingerings: www.wfg.woodwind.org/
Good website! I've been using that one. Tons of fingerings. I've found that some work for me and some don't, so you try several to see which one is better for you.
 

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Yea I'm sorry. Give me like 1-2 weeks I'm in South Florida and forgot to grab my fingering chart when I made a pit stop in Tally. I have the e-mail starred in my inbox so I'll definitely remember it when I get back up there soon!
 

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It will be easier if someone shows a picture chart
Well, since this is from 2008, I wouldn't worry. I don't think you're ready for altissimo yet anyway. Just learn the regular fingerings first.
 

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Shoot, I need to check again... I don't play alto much but I do play a Series 1 crat and a large chamber mouthpiece. Though the tip opening is about as far from a Rascher piece as you can get. I was using a Caravan a few years back when I had a "legit" gig, and don't remember doing anything different for altissimo.
In general I found the standard fingerings (maybe not Rascher) worked fine for me.
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That first G# works fine on my alto. For B I would often just overblow a regular D fingering.
This C fingering works but you can also do the palm key version. I forget, It's maybe just overblowing a palm Eb fingering, perhaps with the G# key as well.
 

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Try this, he demonstrates about 6 options for each note, even those he can't make work, and there's a PDF download. It's the most comprehensive chart I've seen. It's obviously for tenor, I don't know if he's done the same for other horns.

 
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