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The saxophone is pretty much now a 3 octave instrument. Altissimo itself is not difficult to achieve but I am having trouble getting those high notes to blend (in a classical sense) and sound like lower notes below the palm keys. The Ibert has some crazy altissimo in it and none of it is relatively hard to play but getting it to sound warm is a different story. For those of you who major(ed) in saxophone or just happened to know a lot in this subject, how could I make my altissimo sound better or how can I gain more control of my altissimo tone wise? Claude Delangle has a recording of the ibert and his control over the altissimo register is astounding and I know this is just every saxophone player but I want my altissimo to be able to sound as controlled as his.
 

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Any time you need to gain control over any range of the sax, the obvious answer is to include it in your long-tones regimen, eventually adding vibrato to it as you go through the pp/ff/pp cycles.
 

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I find I can soften and warm my altissimo by using less lower lip to get the altissimo and more voicing. Keep the lower lip normal with no added pressure. I also sometimes practice with no tonguing but just air to start the notes and find that softens the harshness of the notes also.
 

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Maybe not directly related, but past the first altissimo note (G), if I play them without the octave key the notes sound fuller (warmer if you like).
I just recently discovered I can play in the altissimo range by just fingering low Bb and using less air and more voicing.
The biggest issue for me is, as the OP said, to incorporate it in your "normal" playing. Be it tone wise and speed...
 

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I would suggest spending a considerable amount of time practicing overtones. The focus should be keeping the same round tone on the overtones as the fundamental.
 

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I would suggest spending a considerable amount of time practicing overtones. The focus should be keeping the same round tone on the overtones as the fundamental.
This.

I played the Ibert on my Senior Recital in 1978.
 

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This.

I played the Ibert on my Senior Recital in 1978.
Me too. In 1999...And I played the Mule cadenza. No one played the Rascher one back then.
 

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As an assist to the other suggestions offered, I can recommend my book "The Altissimo Primer" for developing tonal consistency and reliable control from the beginning altissimo (G) up to high D. The book combines long tones, tonal matching exercises, an acoustical overview important to understanding the approach to this register, and a series of progressive exercises that begin in the traditional register and extend into the altissimo in many different ways.

Paul Cohen
 

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Indeed.

Any time you need to gain control over any range of the sax, the obvious answer is to include it in your long-tones regimen, eventually adding vibrato to it as you go through the pp/ff/pp cycles.
 

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With possibly the best setup to play 4 octaves of range, even John Edward Kelly had some notey-ness in his altissimo. I think the unique tonal differences between certain altissimo notes adds to the sound of the saxophone but as always one should strive towards total excellence - excellence like this recording of music so difficult that players opted to perform it on soprano instead. Hope this provides you with some practice motivation!
 

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Spend a lot of time practicing it. Rarely subject your audience to it...
My neighbours must hate me after a few days lay off from playing. It's all I practice for a bit. Usually an un specific run from the low end to the altissimo. I'm waiting to hear my first thump on the wall. :)
 
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