Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a constant struggle with playing over the changes to All the Things You Are. I love the tune, and I know the changes like the back of my hand... But, I don't have any great ideas to play over it.

Am I alone on this?

Can any of you help me? Are there any exercises that should help?

Since I know many of you will recommend I transcribe, could you list a few solos on this tune (preferably tenor, since that's my main horn...but anything is fine) for me to check out?

Thanks in advance.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
Joined
·
7,584 Posts
You seem to be an amateur so I hope I'm not 'Captain Obvious' here, but one strategy is you'll start a ride playing the melody and playing around with it at the same time. Every little thing you come up with to noodle around with the melody will make you think of something else. And like you would have us believe, you 'know the changes' - so that's it. You play the melody back in your head while at the same time you're embellishing it and using the changes to suggest other permutations. Its like Dixieland but in a different mode; those guys are all doing the same thing I said above, just in a different style. Was Dixieland the beginning of jazz improvisation???
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
Joined
·
7,584 Posts
Sorry, I just listened to whatever that is, and you're up the creek without a paddle. There is no melody to base anything on. Evidently this guy is copying something Chris potter did to demonstrate his technique and everybody thinks its jazz?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,073 Posts
Just because this is a very popular jazz standard doesn't mean it is an easy tune. You may need to learn how to play jazz better and work your way to a tune of this difficulty.
But then again, i dont know your playing level so i cannot be sure.
You dont need to transcribe lines and melodies that came from all the things you are in particular. Learn more musical language from everywhere and apply it appropriately to this tune.
 

·
Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
Joined
·
8,588 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,287 Posts
I have a constant struggle with playing over the changes to All the Things You Are. I love the tune, and I know the changes like the back of my hand... But, I don't have any great ideas to play over it.

Am I alone on this?

Can any of you help me? Are there any exercises that should help?

Since I know many of you will recommend I transcribe, could you list a few solos on this tune (preferably tenor, since that's my main horn...but anything is fine) for me to check out?

Thanks in advance.
Well, that's what soloing is all about I think, ideas.

Some have an abundance of ideas and some don't, depends how creative someone is and how they want things to go.

Books etc can give guidelines and some ideas but it's up to the player to use things in their way really.

Chris Potter's don't grow on trees.

Just keep on trying different things and hope for the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
The tune "Prince Albert" on Blakeys album has same changes as All the things you are. Hank Mobley and Kenny Dorham plays a nice solo on it if you are into that type of sound.

On All the things you are, the II-V-I starts on the second bar which makes it sound a little bit different than a II-V-I starting on the first bar or third bar. It does not sound like the typical II-V resolving to I. I remember I had to get used to that sound when I first practiced that kind of tune.
 

·
Administrator Emeritus
Joined
·
17,467 Posts
Listen a ton to this and other jazz tunes. That together with knowing the chords and having the technique is the basis for developing your solo skills. You should not only know the chords during improvisation, but also hear them in your head together with the melody line. It takes a long time and dedication to fully get it, a study for life! It's easy to say, but difficult to acheive (I'm far away from that level!).

The TOTM thread mentioned by Dave in post #16 is also a good option to learn more about the tune. Dave Pollack (a very skilled player) gave some very useful information in that TOTM thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,624 Posts
To me, the challenge of playing this tune lies in the fact that the rather vanilla chords go on for rather extended periods, the harmony is rather static, and when it does move it moves in a rather predictable way. I suppose this is not a problem if you are a wonderfully inventive melodist. But for the rest of us, it's a good excuse to practice some substitutions that may be used to create and release tension: ie, substitute a minor7th(b5) for some of the ii chords, add a b9 to the dominants, substitute a dominant a tritone away, etc.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top