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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all. I am considering using an air eraser to give a flute body a satin style finish. It is solid silver with plating. I just have a few queries. Firstly, if I lightly mark the surface to give it a textured effect, would it require to be refinished over that in some fashion (replating/clear liquid finish)? Secondly, would it be unwise to do this effect over the tone holes? Would I be better served to leave them as they are? I am just in the speculating stage at the moment. It is not a wonderful flute, but I wouldn't want to wreck it either. Thanks for your time.
 

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Hello all. I am considering using an air eraser to give a flute body a satin style finish. It is solid silver with plating. I just have a few queries. Firstly, if I lightly mark the surface to give it a textured effect, would it require to be refinished over that in some fashion (replating/clear liquid finish)? Secondly, would it be unwise to do this effect over the tone holes? Would I be better served to leave them as they are? I am just in the speculating stage at the moment. It is not a wonderful flute, but I wouldn't want to wreck it either. Thanks for your time.
No this is not a good thing to do it would mess up the flute
 

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Hello all. I am considering using an air eraser to give a flute body a satin style finish. It is solid silver with plating. I just have a few queries. Firstly, if I lightly mark the surface to give it a textured effect, would it require to be refinished over that in some fashion (replating/clear liquid finish)? Secondly, would it be unwise to do this effect over the tone holes? Would I be better served to leave them as they are? I am just in the speculating stage at the moment. It is not a wonderful flute, but I wouldn't want to wreck it either. Thanks for your time.
Don't mess with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you Sacks of Phones and Dogster for your input. The flute is an Artley Artist flute from the early sixties. It's in good shape for it's age, curiously with very sticky rubber pads. And like I said, whilst it's not high end, it is not too bad of a flute either. Thanks again.
 

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A lot depends on the brand and model. If it is a silver tube, the ribs and rings will be brass or nickel so you need to avoid those areas. I have done this to badly worn finishes and I use wet emery for the task. Once the flute is apart it can be done but could look iffy. Another problem is that you will be touching these areas and they will need a touch-up at times where your hands end up rubbing it to a shine.
 

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Don't mess with it.
Why not? As long as you do not get abrasive material in the pivots, no damage done (except for the appearance!)
Messing types of people have to mess with things. They could far, far worse than this.

Good answer, Bruce.
 

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I am concerned that the OP might bend posts or edges of toneholes, then the flute quickly becomes a wallhanging testimonial of “What could go wrong?”
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you everyone for you thoughtful answers. The flute is an Artley Artist, so it has solid silver head and body with plated keys. The body is plated as well. The plating on this instrument is basically 100% and from the looks of it I imagine wasn't played much (it came with the original cotton/wire swab still wrapped). Even with the original sticky rubber pads it sounded OK. Action was smooth enough. Like I said, not a work of art, but for what I paid for it, good. Certainly worth not wrecking. I'll repad it and use it as a second flute. Thanks again for your time.
 

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Is an air eraser made of white rubbery plastic that works better than rubber for erasing pen?
Its a mini sand blaster:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmVFSwNXEb4

Great for etching glass. But I reckon they would go right through silver plating pretty easily.

Dentists use them to etch a surface so that their white tooth material sticks better.
(They also use hydroflouric acid! - with a dental dam so it does not get on your soft tissues.)
 
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