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Discussion Starter #1
I know that people will lambast me for this but I want to make this clear; it's not about aesthetics. I have two newer mouthpieces (see my sig) for tenor that are still shiny and black. I'd like to know if there is anything I can do to remove the shine, to be honest I have gotten used to my Rascher / previous Selmer mouthpieces where I could taste sulfur; now I get literally nauseous tasting this more plasticy stuff. I'm thinking of dipping in vinegar, but I'd just like to be sure of what the best method of removing mouthpiece shine would be, minus playing it constantly for a decade.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ouch, rather nasty reception by the community.

Well, at least I have an empirical reason. Maybe I'll leave it under a florescent light with vinegar or something.
 

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To 'dull' it up you can use some 1000 or higher grit wet/dry sandpaper or 0000 steel wool. Rub very lightly so you don't remove a lot of surface material. Vinegar won't take away the shine.
That won't bring out the sulfer taste. The shiney piece is either plastic (no sulfer) or some other composite that contains only a very low amount.
To get that really good 'rubber tire' smell ya gotta get OLD mouthpieces that had a high sulfer content in the hard rubber recipe. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
To 'dull' it up you can use some 1000 or higher grit wet/dry sandpaper or 0000 steel wool. Rub very lightly so you don't remove a lot of surface material. Vinegar won't take away the shine.
That won't bring out the sulfer taste. The shiney piece is either plastic (no sulfer) or some other composite that contains only a very low amount.
To get that really good 'rubber tire' smell ya gotta get OLD mouthpieces that had a high sulfer content in the hard rubber recipe. :)
This is true, but Selmer and Vandoren have kept reasonably better formulas than Babbitt, right? Maybe not. Either way, I know they're both hard rubber from the aforementioned marques and I'll consider that as well.

We need more Zinner blanks and Chedeville compound in this world.
 

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I know that people will lambast me for this but I want to make this clear; it's not about aesthetics. I have two newer mouthpieces (see my sig) for tenor that are still shiny and black. I'd like to know if there is anything I can do to remove the shine, to be honest I have gotten used to my Rascher / previous Selmer mouthpieces where I could taste sulfur; now I get literally nauseous tasting this more plasticy stuff. I'm thinking of dipping in vinegar, but I'd just like to be sure of what the best method of removing mouthpiece shine would be, minus playing it constantly for a decade.
Why not drop in the basement of an out-house for exactly 36 hours, remove using bar-b-que tongs, and let Dennis Rodman prepare his oriface for a wild night on the town.... should certainly sound "bluesy" after that.
 

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Todays' hard rubber still contains sulfer. Just not as much as the old timers.
I can still remember the smell of my Chedaville clarinet mouthpiece when it got really warm.
Mmmm... new tires.... :)
 

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As other members are saying, you can turn the mpc green by soaking it in bleach.
Vinegar also works well...
But if I were you, I would just use the mpc. Eventually, it will be worn and have a more natural old look...
 

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My Super session turned brown/green after being played outside for a few hours. The wet emery paper (black) in about a #1200 grit will work. Stay away from the rails.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Leaving it in the sun will help. I borrowed a Selmer mouthpiece that was mint, and I took care to use a patch, however after two days sitting in a south facing room with the curtains open, it had turned greeny brown and stinky and so I had to pay for it.

Modern HR can contain up to 50% plastic and still be called HR or Ebonite.
 

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You don't want to hear this, I'm sure, but I'll say it anyway because I can't help myself.

Just play it... a lot. It'll eventually get all old and cruddy-looking, and nobody will question your street cred ever again.
 

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Todays' hard rubber still contains sulfer.
It's not just the sulphur content that gives them that smell/taste. It's the free sulphur. During vulcanization (curing) the sulphur and rubber cross-link into a stable, harder substance, the more sulphur you use (generally) and the more heat/pressure/time for the cure, the harder the resulting plastic. But it doesn't always completely mix. Over time (or with heat or UV light or s chemical reaction) the un-crosslinked sulphur blooms to the surface. I have plenty of very old pieces that have no particular smell or taste, as well as very old and not particularly old ones that do (both of varying quality). I think it's a case of incomplete curing rather than necessarily a sign of better rubber.

Anyway, try sunlight. We're talking about a Selmer and a Vandoren? Should work, probably the Selmer will take less time.
 

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of course there is a good chance that any of these tweaking, beside aesthetic changes, could also produce some less desirable effects such as the dreaded acrid smell and taste which you seem to like...........(which is greatly improved by treatment with lemon oil, my favourite for all sorts of things!) alteration and , G-d forbid!, an increased brittleness (UV are very bad for almost any plastics!).
However if the problem is only that it is so shiny you could get some very fine steelwool and lightly buff your mouthpiece only outside then, proceed to rinse in warm, but not hot, water (protecting the inside stuffing it full of something that would prevent contact with the inside of the mouthpiece) and then give it the vinegar treatment (I would not bleach it .......the impact of chlorine could be more damaging than beneficial). It should assume the " relic" look that you are after.......on the other hand Pillinger makes copies of mouthpieces by using a plastic which colour (Pete Thomas knows everything about this!) looks very similar to what you are after.......
 

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This is a good reason to consider playing on metal. :bluewink:
 

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Just curious, if it's not about aesthetics, what is it about? Rub it with steel wool just enough to take off the shine or soak it in warm water. It may turn green.
 
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