Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

I bought this saxophone a while ago. The seller assured me that the lacquer was original. My tech who lives in The Netherlands and doesn’t see many us horns thinks it might be a relacq. Can one of the experts here give me their thoughts???
Thx!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
566 Posts
relacquer i think.
see the leaves around the SELMER,and the word SELMER under that and the R under that has been buffed.
yes,some of the flowery stuff looks not buffed.

it would also be good to see the engraving around the edges and also the serial# area.

one also would need the saxophone in the hands to be absolutely positive,like your tech has seen it in person.

more photos please.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
One more.

Ps: seller seems legit and my tech is a professional with more experience in european ensembled selmers.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
38,889 Posts
Original.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Hey all,

I bought this saxophone a while ago. The seller assured me that the lacquer was original. My tech who lives in The Netherlands and doesn’t see many us horns thinks it might be a relacq. Can one of the experts here give me their thoughts???
Thx!
I don;t call myself an "expert" but my vote is with the relaquered group. Besides what's been mentioned, look at the engraving detail insides the leaves - it looks to be polished off. Also the Patent numbers and serial number look buffed and not sharp around the edges. Also, to me, the general look under the lacquer does not look clear and crisp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I don;t call myself an "expert" but my vote is with the relaquered group. Besides what's been mentioned, look at the engraving detail insides the leaves - it looks to be polished off. Also the Patent numbers and serial number look buffed and not sharp around the edges. Also, to me, the general look under the lacquer does not look clear and crisp.
I've been a respected repair tech for over 45 years. In order to give an honest opinion I would have to see
it in my hands to be sure. I can see various things in the photos that can go either way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,498 Posts
One good thing, if it's really hard to tell the difference then it's almost certain that, even if it has been redone, the relacquering has not affected its playing qualities. Since, personally, I buy saxophones to play them, that would be enough for me.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,294 Posts
Always hard to be sure from photos, but my money is on original. The engraving has not been buffed but the Selmer stamp looks as though it might have been. Euro horns were not engraved through the lacquer so it could have had a light buff up after stamping but prior to engraving and lacquering which would account for that apparent anomaly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Always hard to be sure from photos, but my money is on original. The engraving has not been buffed but the Selmer stamp looks as though it might have been. Euro horns were not engraved through the lacquer so it could have had a light buff up after stamping but prior to engraving and lacquering which would account for that apparent anomaly.
What's your opinion on the bottom patent numbers and serial number? They don't look crisp. My Mark VI alto is in the 150's and it just looks different - mine has very crisp numbers with a little rust around the edges - that would be characteristic of a horn that's been out and played a lot. My Selmer logo is crisp and "un-buffed" looking... It could still be a wonderful horn either way.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,294 Posts
Sorry, it's NOT a euro horn is it. I think my original explanation still stands however, and maybe even more likely as it's an American assembled horn. Made in France (with all the stamps and numbers), shipped to America for assembly and lacquering and engraving. Quite probable that horns sometimes needed a buff up before lacquering and engraving. The engraving definitely doesn't look buffed to me.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,953 Posts
Quite probable that horns sometimes needed a buff up before lacquering and engraving. The engraving definitely doesn't look buffed to me.
I agree absolutely that before lacquering then definitely cleaning would have to be done, and possibly light buffing would be required. However if the horn is new I can't imagine any buffing heavy enough to remove the definition of the stamping would be necessary.


The main reason for the kind of heavy buffing typical of relacquers is the necessity to buff out scratches or marks possibly left from repair work.

So light buffing should not cause any noticeable wear to engraving or stamping. IMO.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,294 Posts
I agree absolutely.......
Pete, there must be something wrong if we agree on something......... Ha! ;)

But seriously, I do agree that light buffing shouldn't cause any noticeable (or rather perhaps, significant) wear to the stamping, but even light buffing on engraving is usually noticeable, even on photos, and there doesn't seem to be any noticeable wear to the engraving in this case. Also, very often the stamping process doesn't make full or complete impressions. That combined with a slight softening as the result of a light pre-lacquer buff could have produced the results we see in these photos. Always impossible to say for sure, especially from photos, but that's what seems to be the most likely explanation in this case IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
just play the thing.
it's not like it's the most amazing lacquer condition anyway so if it was relacquered it was long, long ago, probably when it was fairly regularly done by experienced shops.
...you already own it...the seller seems legit...How will you feel if you think it's a relacquer? What, then are the implications? Will it help you to sleep at night if you think it's original lacquer? I think so.
My vote, then, is original lacquer!
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top