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I've not played a Conn . . . but routinely play a 1928 Buescher. I've made no allowance for it being a vintage sax. I currently play a Super Session H, but have played a Yamaha 4C, a Bari, 2 Morgans, and probably a couple of others. Unless it proves otherwise, I'd treat it like it was a 2011 model and just play it with whatever you have. If you don't have anything, the Yamaha 4C certainly isn't terrible and would give you a cheap point of reference to change from.
 

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I own a M205XXX. IMO, any squeeze throat design will give the best results intonation wise. That is, a long slim mouthpiece will be better than a short fat mouthpiece. Most sop sax mouthpieces are of that design. Selmer, Vandoren, Bari, Woodwind, Meyer, Link, Yamaha, etc. But I am also of the opinion that this design is good for modern sop saxes.
 

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IMO, any squeeze throat design will give the best results intonation wise.
Mojo is right on it about pieces that play well and in tune on old Conn sopranos. A Selmer S80, with a "not too small" tip opening and a reasonable facing, will make that Conn play well and in tune. Those Conn horns need air to speak well and too small a tip will make the bottom hard to play. The same can be said of high baffle pieces in general.
 

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The best I have found was a Link HR Florida Slant 5* but if you can find one it will probably be over $700. I have used all types of Selmers, Vandorens and Links and now use a Yamaha 4C or 5C. Great at any price.
 

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I own a M205XXX. IMO, any squeeze throat design will give the best results intonation wise. That is, a long slim mouthpiece will be better than a short fat mouthpiece. Most sop sax mouthpieces are of that design. Selmer, Vandoren, Bari, Woodwind, Meyer, Link, Yamaha, etc. But I am also of the opinion that this design is good for modern sop saxes.
Respectfully, am really rather surprised by some of the comments and consensus shown so far on this thread. Most of the information I've gathered from SOTW over the last couple of years has pretty much concluded that for the vintage large bore sopranos, Buescher, Conn, Martin, etc., most folks have found that larger chamber mpcs, vintage and some modern, and possibly some medium pieces, perhaps Link and Meyer, would be most compatible. And this has certainly borne out in my own experience. Primarily this is an issue of ability to play the older horns in tune throughout the range, but there is also the problem that many have run into of simply not being able to get the mpc far enough onto the neck cork, without having to resort to cutting off a portion of the mpc shank.

I purchased last year a nicely opened up (.057 w/ small roll over baffle) vintage Buescher mpc from Joe Giardulo specifically for the above reasons. It works beautifully with my old Buescher curvy, particularly intonation wise, whereas I had all kinds of difficulties with longer squeeze throat designs, such as Selmer and Morgan. I do use, however, the squeeze throat design on my modern narrower bore Yani soprano.

Perhaps because I am a relatively new soprano player, with not so well developed emboucher as others, this has been more of a complicating issue for me. I don't know. However, from both my own experience, and also what I thought had gleaned from others here, the comments on this thread so far run counter to my expectations. What am I missing?
 

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Somehow I have found that the curvies tend to like large chambers wheras the straight one work with anything. The old Conn and Buescher mouthpieces are nice but I find the Yamaha has a nice blend of smooth vintage sound and edge when you need it. At under $20, worth a try.
 

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Somehow I have found that the curvies tend to like large chambers
Or medium round chambers. What they don't like is a squared chamber or baffling.

Wonder if any acoustical science is known about this - beyond the usual bore vs. chamber knowledge that is. Why would the curved horn exhibit different intonation?
 

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Respectfully, am really rather surprised by some of the comments and consensus shown so far on this thread. Most of the information I've gathered from SOTW over the last couple of years has pretty much concluded that for the vintage large bore sopranos, Buescher, Conn, Martin, etc., most folks have found that larger chamber mpcs...


Perhaps because I am a relatively new soprano player, with not so well developed emboucher as others, this has been more of a complicating issue for me. I don't know. However, from both my own experience, and also what I thought had gleaned from others here, the comments on this thread so far run counter to my expectations. What am I missing?

I believe the advice of Mojo is based on the design change of bore & total long of the Conn sopranos which hapened around serial # 200xxx (I believe 1929), known as "streched" Conn sopranos.
I understand usually those Conn sopranos requires a not so big chamber piece to stay well in tune, as Mojo said:"any squeeze throat design will give the best results intonation wise".
 

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Hope this doesn't derail the thread, but something I picked up at a recent and ongoing Bb Tenor thread called "Tune your Selmer sharp?" contained this intriguing quote:

"As someone else mentioned, it is not actually "tuning sharp" but setting the mouthpiece to where the instrument is in tune with a lower input pitch. My take on this is that when pushing the mouthpiece farther on the cork, it subtracts from the "equivalent volume" of the mouthpiece* required to match the volume of the missing cone in order for the sax to play properly. This volume is then made up by the player opening the oral cavity and putting less pressure on the reed with the embouchure allowing it to travel farther as it vibrates.

* In Benade's writing, the "equivalent volume" of the mouthpiece is greater than its measured interior volume, because of the distance traveled by the reed as it vibrates, and the effects of the player's oral cavity. In one of my acoustics tests I measured the equivalent volume of a Rousseau 4R to be 28% greater than its played physical volume using a "classical" embouchure and mouthpiece input pitch."

Maybe of more importance than the physical volume of the interior of a particular mouthpiece is the proper placement of the mouthpiece on the saxophone and the varying of the tongue position and the oral cavity in order to best compensate for and match the characteristics of the bore cone. It would seem such considerations would be most critical in relation to the soprano saxophone because the tolerances are so small... whether vintage or new, straight or curvy.
 

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I just think any high baffle mouthpiece is not suited to any of the older sopranos. As a Matter of fact.....I don't like them on any modern soprano either. I had a few Mark VIs and they were fine on the stock Selmer mouthpieces but I still think the standard (not Custom) Yamahas are the best all around soprano mouthpiece. I don't like them on the other horns however. For Alto, I mainly use Selmers or sometimes a Meyer, tenor Brilhart/Rico family (also like the meyers) and Bari whatever works on that horn.
Really, try the Yamaha as it is cheap and someday you may get a call to play a melodic sweet piece that flows.
 

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"Really, try the Yamaha as it is cheap and someday you may get a call to play a melodic sweet piece that flows."
Classic line, Bruce!
Yes, go with the Yamaha 4C or 5C to start. And don't be dissuaded by the low price. Don't think cheap, think worth ever penny and much more. Then, when you're ready and feel daring, splurge and go to the 6C!
 

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My Conn Soprano is not a stretch soprano design. I think these came a little later. Paul L has one that has it's own intonation challenges. I ended up making him a mouthpiece out of a Buescher C sop blank that helps with intonation. There are still some note to note issues, but a mouthpiece can not help with that.

I love the sound of short stubby mouthpieces. I just find that when I use them, the palm keys and the high left hand notes are all way sharp. And I'm a bari sax player so I tend to play loose. Though I have tried playing tighter and pulling out the mouthpiece and it makes things worse for me on sop. So, the long narrow squeeze throat mouthpieces allow me to pull out the mouthpiece a little (or they are just longer by design) which makes the palm keys flatter in comparison to the mid and low range.
 

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personally, I stopped looking for another mouthpiece after using the SELMER Metal Classic D soprano mpc.
but what works for one does not always work for another.
keep trying as many as possible - do not be brand conscious - so long it works for you!
 

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Tone aside, which is obviously a personal characteristic, the issue of playing vintage Conn sopranos in tune is one I've had come up again and again. My response is always the same- try an S80 on it (don't be concerned about the tone) and see if the tuning issues disappear. They do most of the time. Then, a player knows he has a horn that CAN play in tune, as opposed to a horn that has a bad scale.

Then, the issues of tone and response can be pursued with some certainty.

Going from the opposite end and getting a great sound that isn't in tune is a long, frustrating path to travel. We players tend to think that WE are doing something incorrectly and we start making small and large "adjustments" and all hell can break loose.

My suggestion was based on the belief that nailing down the tuning issues is the way to go first.
 

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Amen! I fought with my soprano through HS, College and many years later. I was trying to tune to C3 and was lipping the sax all over the place. Embouchure support was all over the place. I then read the articles written by Paul Coats and dialed in the intonation first. I still have some issues since I'm only an occasional sop sax player, but I can pull off a performance with a little practice.

You can get a darker sounding mouthpiece by looking for a mouthpiece with less or no roll-over baffle. This does not throw off the octave intonation like a larger barrel chamber mouthpiece can.
 

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Respectfully, am really rather surprised by some of the comments and consensus shown so far on this thread. Most of the information I've gathered from SOTW over the last couple of years has pretty much concluded that for the vintage large bore sopranos, Buescher, Conn, Martin, etc., most folks have found that larger chamber mpcs, vintage and some modern, and possibly some medium pieces, perhaps Link and Meyer, would be most compatible.
I never liked the vintage style, large chambered mouthpieces on my curved True Tone soprano. I got it in high school and it came with a bunch of those old pieces, but the one I preferred and used for years, was an old George Bundy. The Bundy differs from the other large chambered pieces, as it has flat sidewalls... and I guess that amounts to a certain bit of squeeze. Now flash forward a couple decades later and I try a Super Session that is just an incredible match for my old Buescher, with much better intonation for me than with the Bundy. Now that was about ten years ago, and I had also read the comments on this site in regard to the older, large chambered pieces being a better match. So around that time I took out all those old mouthpieces and gave them a go, and they were basically unplayable for me. They didn't go to waste however, as trading them pretty much bankrolled my mouthpiece quests for my other horns. But I can still see how some folks might have the opposite experience, as we all blow differently, but I also favor the squeeze type design for vintage sopranos.
 

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I play an old (straight) Conn soprano as well. I tried over 20 different mouthpieces back to back with an impartial listener and honed my choices down to a Super Session J and a SA80. While I absolutely LOVED the Super Session on most of the horn,especially low down,it tended to go a little off the rails in some other places.While I thought with a little work I could get it to play well across the board ,my listener didn't care for it at all. So bog standard SA80 it was and I can't say I'm at all unhappy. The horn sounds good without that Turkish squealing sound,warm and full with great projection and LOUD,or so everyone keeps telling me.
 
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