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Discussion Starter #1
I thought I would get a good answer on this forum, but if this isn't the best place to post then my apologies

Something that happens frequently in music is that at a crucial point the whole band suddenly stops playing on an accented drumbeat, except for the singer, or perhaps a solo instrument, or perhaps even everybody might stop. In the case of a self accompanied singer, they would stop playing at an accented beat but carry on singing.
In classical music this might be a cadenza interval where the rhythm is broken, but I am thinking more of blues, jazz, rhythm and blues, latin and sometimes straight pop, where the rhythm is still implied and the musicians have to carry it in their heads and start playing in time a bar or two later.
Sometimes the leader or singer conducts the stops and starts, but sometimes the band can do it by heart.
The most popular example I can think of is the capitalized words in Elvis's "Heartbreak hotel"

W-e-e-e-ll
SINCE my baby left me, I
FOUND a new place to go, it's
DOWN the road on lonely street

etc etc

This might occurr once in isolation or several times in a row, as above.

What do you call this?

I used to call it a "Break" but our drummer interpretes "Break" to mean that he carries on playing, albeit in a different accented style. And all other opinions I have sought concur with that.
In my view a "pause" wouldn't be the same, because in a pause the rhythm can be broken.

Furthermore, what is the correct way to write this ? I suppose on a multi piece arrangement you could just write in one beat in staccato followed by rests at the time of the stop, but is there a simpler way, and, especially on a simple "chord sheet" as opposed to formal notation, what symbol would you use?

With thanks
 

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I would call it a "break", when it's a whole chorus a "stop chorus"
 

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I'd call it a "break." Come on, now - you know how drummers are! :D Just tell him to stop playing!!! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
"Come on, now - you know how drummers are! "

I'm finding out!
 

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It's also called "Stop time" where the rhythm section will stop, but still count time. THe first part should be easy, the second can be a known issue with drummers (except they are the only ones who don't know). ;)
 

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I think it could generally be called a break. But in the specific example of "Heartbreak Hotel" with the breaks coming at the beginning of every measure during that section, I would call it "stop time." I usually think of "breaks" as coming at the end of a phrase or chorus.

Eitherway, your drummer is wrong (big surprise); "Break" in no way implies that he necessarily keeps playing. Unless, of course, you're playing "drum breaks."
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Aaaah, a DRUM break, as opposed to a break, would help differentiate it.
This is really helpful.
And how would you write it, with a # ?
Up to now I have been using //
So if "break" is appropriate then // or # would be ok?
IS there a symbol for a drum break?
 
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