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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone:

I have inherited an Olds Alto Sax that was missing the neck. The aftermarket neck I purchased is perhaps ~1/16 in too large to fit into the body socket. I have looked through the archives, and the most seemingly logical approach to trying to get the neck to fit was:


“….I sure understand. Asian stuff can be great. I sell a lot of the plastic/wood part piccolos.
A good sanding material is "plumbers emery" that comes in a roll from Home Depot. It is usually blue and is less than an inch in width. This is what they use before soldering pipes together. You can wrap it around the cork or a tenon with about a foot of it, hold the ends between your fingers and rotate it around. I use it all the time. Once you have the item a bit fatter than you need, wet #600 black emery paper gets is smooth….”

My question relates to the following:

1. Is this still likely a good way to approach this? The original post was from around 2005, so I am not sure if there is other advice or ideas I should consider instead.

2. Is the above estimate of time sanding (~1 hr) seemingly accurate in regards to the amount of material I am anticipating needing to remove?

3. Any other helpful suggestions?

PipeTobacco
 

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Hello Everyone:

I have inherited an Olds Alto Sax that was missing the neck. The aftermarket neck I purchased is perhaps ~1/16 in too large to fit into the body socket.
~1/16” - compare that to the wall thickness of the tenon. It seems like you’ll be trying to remove about half the thickness.

+1 to taking it to a tech. It’s not just about the diameter, but you’ll want to have a joint that is leak-free. The probability of you removing that much material and making a good seal is low. A better path will likely be to replace the tenon.

Bottom line suggestion: Return the neck and purchase a neck that is closer to being a good fit.
 
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Find a tech that has a tenon compression tool. These tools also ensure the tenon stays round.

Don’t sand it.
 
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In my experience shrinking or expanding a saxophone neck tenon more than 3 or 4 thousandths is looking for trouble. My apprentice tried to shrink an alto neck tenon more than that and ended up damaging the collet. 1/16" is the same as .0625" and is far outside of the practical range to work with.
 

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In all seriousness, get an accurate measurement of you receiver size your alto, and get another neck that will fit. You can try to sell the oversized neck you have now. If the size difference is really about 1/16", you will not be able to compensate for that difference.
With that large of a tenon, it could be that the internal neck diameter is also too large, which could affect intonation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you all for your replies. The challenge is in finding a different neck. All the necks I find are showing a similar diameter.

I am wondering if it is feasible to slightly expand the receiver on the saxophone itself to be able to receive the neck as is? Is there a tool that can be used to uniformly expand this receiver area that 1/16th of an inch?
PipeTobacco
 

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Thank you all for your replies. The challenge is in finding a different neck. All the necks I find are showing a similar diameter.

I am wondering if it is feasible to slightly expand the receiver on the saxophone itself to be able to receive the neck as is? Is there a tool that can be used to uniformly expand this receiver area that 1/16th of an inch?
PipeTobacco
The receiver consists of much thicker metal than the tenon, so the answer is no. Besides, making that big of a bulge in the taper of the saxophone at that location will certainly have an effect upon the intonation.
 

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~1/16” - compare that to the wall thickness of the tenon. It seems like you’ll be trying to remove about half the thickness.
1/16" is about 1.6mm. Tenons can be pretty variable in wall thickness, from very flimsy thin ones to way-too-thick ones. I just measured a standard one (Selmer SII) and it's 0.8mm. So I verified what I suspected that if you sand 1/16" off, in most cases you would pretty much sand the entire tenon off :)

To the OP, like saxoclese wrote, it's not really possible. Off by that much, I would rather make a new tenon. Unless...
That neck has one of those extremely thick tenons. I would measure accurately to know how much needs to be removed and what wall thickness will be left. If it will be about 0.7mm or more after, then it's probably ok. 0.6mm might still be ok, hard to say how thin is ok because it depends on a few other things. However, sanding that much would take ages. Keeping it round and eventually fit well, without removing the tenon, is probably going to take much longer than person is willing to spend on it. I would remove the tenon, turn it almost to fit (largest that would be possible to fit) and then shrink to fit (if there's enough metal for that).

I am wondering if it is feasible to slightly expand the receiver on the saxophone itself to be able to receive the neck as is? Is there a tool that can be used to uniformly expand this receiver area that 1/16th of an inch?
It's not possible. If it's a pretty robust and thick socket (receiver) then an option might be to unsolder it and bore it larger for the other neck.

Keep in mind what saxclese wrote about that too, and also that since the tenon is so much larger, if the tenon isn't particularly thick and the bore is also much larger, then some parts of the neck (other than the tenon, but also the tenon) have a much larger bore than the original neck, which could cause all sorts of weird things to how it plays (or it could improve... by coincidence or not).
 

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@PipeTobacco

even asian necks come in different tenon sizes ( although generally 24,5mm) you should find the one that comes closer, should you NOT find it then you are left with a very much more complicated situation and you have to ask yourself whether it is worth hanging on to the horn that gives you so many troubles with finding a neck
 

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@PipeTobacco some options to review here.
 
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