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From Bassicsax:
Oscar Adler was based in Markneukirchen, and is recognized as being the first company to build a saxophone in the German-speaking region. Their first horn was built in 1901, and marked the beginning of Oscar Adler’s reign as Germany’s king of all things sax. This reign would last for 20 years: until Julius Keilwerth left Oscar Adler and began manufacturing saxes under his own name, and Kohlert became a significant player as well.

In time Oscar Adler designed and sold a great many models of saxophones—all at the same time. A 1932 catalogue outlines the 11 different models that were offered by the company, of which the Triumph was the top of line.

Prior to the 1930s, the Triumph was available in Bb soprano, Bb curved soprano, Eb alto, C melody, Bb tenor, Eb baritone, C bass, as well as Bb bass. Afterwards, the Triumph was only available in alto, C melody, and tenor versions.

What makes some Oscar Adler models so unusual, among other things, is that they have duplicate low Bb, B, and C# keys—which were operated by the middle finger of the right hand. (...)However, what made the Triumph stand out as the top of the line horn, was its range. The Triumph was the only saxophone keyed from low Bb to high G! (end citation)



This is the most rare and arguably most advanced saxophone ever produced in Germany - it was built in the late 1920s - till beginning 1930s.

Here is a link to a Dropbox with pictures in High-Resolution


Here are the significant key features:
* 5 Keys in the left hand - for high D, Eb, F, F#, G. high F-G are coupled.
* An extra lever connected to the front f to open the octave key on the neck for all altissimo-fingerings involving front F.
It basically raises the octave key as well when it is already open and helps to produce a higher overtone/top tone, similar to Eugene Rousseaus exercises in overblowing the higher register in sixths. This is a unique pateted feature I have never seen on any other saxophone. Cool also for extra multiphonics.
* Low LOW C#, B and Bb can be played with the right hand (Evette Schaeffer System) in addition for trills.
* Low C can be played with an extra key next to the RH thumb rest - ideal for the otherwise non executable trill Eb-C. (I have seen this on Couesnons).
* Additional G# Trill key in the RH.
* High and middle D key in the RH. (also works as a trill key).
* Additional Eb-Trill key with an open hole on the low D-cup (like on the Apogee and early Buffet etc.).
* Another key could be added next to RH thumb rest to control the low B as well (the connection is there) - but the key and the axis weren´t added.

Given the complexity of the mechanism it amazes me how lightly the sax plays and with a clear beautiful dark voice. I played in addition to the original mouthpiece also with a Brilhart and Selmer mouthpiece on it and they both work. In general large chamber mouthpeices are better on these instruments (but that might be just my taste). The keywork is rather intricate and it feels more like playing a clarinet, it does need time for thos who would use it in concerts to adjust to all the extra fingering possibillities - but it is a lot of fun and one of these things where I wonder why some innovations didn´t find their way to modern horns....

I will see to post a video within the next days.
 

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Fascinating. I want to see this Adler, but the pic link doesn't work for me.
 

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Amazing and beautiful! Those extra keys were very forward thinking. The Beaufort sax had similar keys but more primitive.
 

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Beaufort?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
...thank you, that´s very kind. I think (with more practice form my side) this particular feature witht he front F-key is a great add on on any horn, easier and more efficient then the "Harmonic" Key on a Selmer, but that´s just my opinion. In general I hope it´s easy to see that the sax is not a museum piece (I had a full Apogee Buffet once which did not really work for modern playing) but can easily be used for simply playing music. A lot of fun. Tonal wise I am now thinking it reminds me more of a Buescher than any other vintage saxophones.
 
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