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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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It’s a non-issue to me.

Beyond that, what if you send it back and get a cosmetically perfect instrument that doesn’t play as well?

What matters?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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36,403 Posts
That is my fear at the moment because this is the best playing W020 out of 6 that I've tried. Im not too worried if its cosmetic but I've been taught that it is detrimental to the brass's health as it could spread through the whole horn.
If someone could please clarify If this is myth or not cause I'm non the wiser.
No, it won’t spread over the entire horn. Notice that acid bleed occurs at the edges of parts that are joined by solder. That acid bleed is literally excess flux that was under the edges of the part when it was soldered to the body. It kept the finish from bonding there, and that is why you see the defect now. FWIW, you will also see - with time spent playing the horn - that the finish wears away at the touches for the palm keys and side keys. Visualize that wear as proof that you are playing the horn, rather than sitting ‘round and judging its cosmetics.

The finish is more at risk if you live near salt water (ocean), yet there is little that one can do to avoid it there. Using a finish protectant like Meguiars will help seal the finish and keep it shiny - just like protecting the finish on a new guitar or car.

Enjoy your new horn. Those are great instruments.
 
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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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In his bench review of Yanagisawa baris, Stephen Howard recommends "nipping it in the bud" if the flux bleed happens early in the sax's life.


View attachment 127678
"I'm often asked if these spots should be dealt with. I think it's safe to assume that if they've been there for any great length of time it's unlikely that they'll spread - but if they pop up within the first few years of a horn's life then it's perhaps wise to nip them in the bud."

I'm all for bud nipping, so forgive me if I didn't see it, but what was his recommendation for action?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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It will never spread to the whole horn, it not that acid bleed is like potato blight .
I love that analogy.

It is tyny droplets of flux or may even be water trapped under the lacquer, which deposited there (and didn’t dry ) in your case it is minimal and may neve ever get any ,more than that. It’s not a disease.
+1
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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The nice thing about lacquer is it will burn in to itself unlike other finishes, so it can be touched up without showing.
Not if the color changes - either due to tinting or aging.
 
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