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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, just recently got a Yanagisawa AWO20 about 2 weeks ago. For the last 3 days I've been monitoring acid bleed under my lacquer at the palm keys and body brace
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and was wondering if anyone can give me some advice.

Im a technician based in South Africa and its gonna cost me a fortune to send it back to Dawkes to have them send it back to Yanagisawa :cautious:. I really love this horn and have been reading serval forums and threads on how to potentially clear up the acid bleed.

Should I arrest the acid bleed now or wait it out till it "stabilises" and if so how would you approach the repair?
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
well, it is really minimal

the acid bleed many never ever go any more than it is(or not) there is no way for you to know it.

Acid bleed are a fact of life, sometimes theyare there sometimes they are not, they are not visible at the time the horn is made and finished.

If you “ clean “ the spot where it is you will be left with another sort of defacing , again it will be minimal and you may be able to touch up the lacquer.

But is it worth it?

Probably not. I understand you spent good money but I think you may be better contacting Dawkes to talk about a part refund and then forget about it. It may never be more than this. One day your horn wil have scratches and dings and you will see this thing in perpective. Now this is all you can think about and it is sad, its a beautiful horn.
I appreciate the advise, will keep on monitoring it, it also arrived with a few scratches so I'll definitely opt on the partial refund.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
“ few scratches" which I should imagine must be incredibly small if I take the acid bleeding as a measure of defects.

If this horn came in an unopened box the acid bleeding was probably there from the beginning and developed unseen but if the box was opened (hence the “ scratches”) then should have been picked up by the shop.

Yanagisawa is next to perfection when it comes to the way they do things and yet, it can always happen. Again even simply handling you horn you will “ scratch “ it but again they will be your scratches not “ theirs”.

As it is you could , almost invisibly , remove the lacquer in a very very thin strip around the “ rib” and then clean the metal underneath but then the metal would be unprotected so, don’t look at it, it is also on a little visible spot.
Unless you plan to keep the horn on a shelf, dings, dents, scratches and lacquer wear are an eventuality. I know you bought it new and were expecting more, but as you said, you love the horn. And as I often say, you don't play the shine.
Yeah I know you should see my other horn😆 my 62 has been through life and yeah it just sucks that it had to happen on a new WO20 and not my 62.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It’s a non-issue to me.

Beyond that, what if you send it back and get a cosmetically perfect instrument that doesn’t play as well?

What matters?
That is my fear at the moment because this is the best playing W020 out of 6 that I've tried. Im not too worried if its cosmetic but I've been taught that it is detrimental to the brass's health as it could spread through the whole horn.
If someone could please clarify If this is myth or not cause I'm non the wiser.
 
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