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I want to ask that how to do glisando...many player do on it and sound really great. And what should i practice to improve on it? Thanks:)
 

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A glissando is made by moving the larynx not by dropping the jaw.
It's most effective in the upper register, especialy the palm keys where you can usually lower the pitch by a 3rd or a 4th.
Finger your high F but try to get a D,C# or a C natural below that by moving your larynx down, then move your larynx up to get to the F.
A good exercise is to play scales using only the mpc, try to get a range of a 6th or an octave.
 

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I'm assuming this is for quick gliss' though, but what happens if we find a :line2:/:space5: ?

Does it still involve the larynx, or is it just quick finger movement?
 

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A larynx gliss is only effective in the upper register (well for me anyway).
You would have to do it with your fingers in that register (G1 to G2).

I know that some players use a combination of fingering and larynx glissandos (glissandi?) to obtain a seamless gliss from one note to another over a wider range, but it's not something I've worked on a lot.

It's easier done on clarinet, especially with the open holes.
If you listen the the opening cadenza of "Rhapsody in Blue" you'll hear some clarinetists using this technique, even thought in the score it's a written out diatonic gliss.
 

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Kareeser said:
I'm assuming this is for quick gliss' though, but what happens if we find a :line2:/:space5: ?

Does it still involve the larynx, or is it just quick finger movement?
Using the fingers, practice this slowly, gradually increasing the speed always playing close attention to control and accuracy. As Daigle56 recommends, combining the fingers with voicing (moving the larynx) can be effective.
 

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A slide up or down using the larynx is quite different from a gliss or fall using fingers moving down the scale (although the two can be somewhat combined).

I'm not sure which type of gliss Alexwan is referring to. If he means the typical fall down an octave or so, then the traditional way to do that is to slur down the chromatic scale. For an octave or more, I find it easier to use a scale in the key (major or minor), rather than the chromatic scale. For a shorter fall, the chromatic scale works pretty well. Either way you have to get the finger action very smooth. It helps to target a note and slide down to it, also dropping your volume and essentially fading out on the target note. It's hard to explain, and it takes some practice.
 

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JL said:
....the traditional way to do that is to slur down the chromatic scale....... It helps to target a note and slide down to it, also dropping your volume and essentially fading out on the target note.
Yeah...I've always heard that refered to as a fall, very common in big band charts.
The title of his thread is "About Glissando..." so I figured that was what he ment, but there could be a difference in terminology.
 

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I've always admired the downward gliss in the lower register on the original Pink Panther recording, really seamless. My guess is that there is a combination of chromatics and jaw dropping being used, but if anybody knows and wants to chime in...
 

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I've always admired the downward gliss in the lower register on the original Pink Panther recording, really seamless. My guess is that there is a combination of chromatics and jaw dropping being used, but if anybody knows and wants to chime in...
Yes...it's a combination of a chromatic gliss, jaw dropping (bending), but also, a very slight growl effect, and, not to mention falling off the volume as JL said.

I've been able to reproduce that sound almost exactly, but I had to experiment a lot until I was able to get it. I think the hardest part is to not fall off the volume too early. Picking a target note "way down there" is a good way to make sure you don't fade-out too fast.
 
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