Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've just had a biopsy done on a lump on my tongue and my referral is an "Urgent Suspected Cancer". I am staring down the barrel of not having most of a tongue going forward, and maybe even not even going forward.

I'm so sad that this could be the end of sax for me.

I Suppose I wanted to tell people who would understand how devastating that thought could be, lots of people on cancer forums don't seem to have a specialist use for their tongue.

IF it comes to death etc. well that would be ****, but even if I could survive It could be the end of sax (And all the other wind instruments I play). OR is it... HAs anyone else been here or similar?

I really F*** hope MIlandro doesn;t turn up to tell me to search the forum becase I am not in the mood! :D (plus I already did)
 

·
Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
13,244 Posts
Sorry to hear that. I don't think it has to be the end. You can still play by using your air for the note attacks instead of the tongue. Also, even if they have to take a good portion of the front of the tongue, many people articulate with the middle of their tongue while anchor tonguing. Wishing you an outcome that still allows you to play.........
 

·
VENDOR "Innovation over imitation"
Joined
·
16,451 Posts
I've just had a biopsy done on a lump on my tongue and my referral is an "Urgent Suspected Cancer". I am staring down the barrel of not having most of a tongue going forward, and maybe even not even going forward.

I'm so sad that this could be the end of sax for me.

I Suppose I wanted to tell people who would understand how devastating that thought could be, lots of people on cancer forums don't seem to have a specialist use for their tongue.

IF it comes to death etc. well that would be ****, but even if I could survive It could be the end of sax (And all the other wind instruments I play). OR is it... HAs anyone else been here or similar?

I really F*** hope MIlandro doesn;t turn up to tell me to search the forum becase I am not in the mood! :D (plus I already did)
The best advice I can give you is to stay as positive as you possibly can. I certainly hope this is not the end of your saxophone playing, and I can tell you for sure that jumping to an early conclusions and worrying about that stuff will do no good for you. Positivity is everything!!!!
I am hoping you get the answer for yourself where things will not change for you in terms of playing the saxophone.
Just stay as strong and positive as you can.
Life throws us all a lot of curveballs. I am a big believer in positive thinking.
I am hoping for the best for you!!!!!! ❤❤❤
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
41,885 Posts
I really F*** hope MIlandro doesn;t turn up to tell me to search the forum becase I am not in the mood! :D (plus I already did)
Sorry to hear about this, this is very serious, I offer you my sincere sympathy as sincere and as much as I have tried to offer help throughout these years to the people searching something, always taking time to actually suggest the threads that hey need and never saying only “ search “.

Be well.
Hopefully surgery will not be as destructive as you may now think.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Logician
Joined
·
27,333 Posts
Someone very close to me had a cancerous lesion on their tongue. When they first noticed it, if it were lasered off right there and then, there may have never been any further consequences. But believing it was caused by biting/grinding, time went on until an initial biopsy was benign. Then dentists/oral surgeons bounced them around when it came back and ultimately became cancerous. They're not a wind player, and the lesion was on the side in the middle of the tongue. So when it came off with the margins... and the lymph nodes on the neck... the tongue was still functional. Different. Affected speech, but only someone who had known them prior would catch the difference. Radiation was an option as opposed to the cutting, but not taken given their situation.

So hopefully it's benign and not in a bad spot. But get it removed anyway so you don't have to deal with more vigorous treatment which would definitely affect your playing. Also make certain that you're treating with an oral surgeon with oncology experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
I'm sorry that you must go through this terrifying situation. I hope that you have an oncology team (not a dentist).
Regardless of the treatment, you WILL continue to play your saxophone. You may encounter a learning curve, but you CAN do it. SOTW will continue to send you positive energy and we will pray for the best prognosis.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
29,620 Posts
I've just had a biopsy done on a lump on my tongue and my referral is an "Urgent Suspected Cancer". I am staring down the barrel of not having most of a tongue going forward, and maybe even not even going forward.

I'm so sad that this could be the end of sax for me.

I Suppose I wanted to tell people who would understand how devastating that thought could be, lots of people on cancer forums don't seem to have a specialist use for their tongue.

IF it comes to death etc. well that would be ****, but even if I could survive It could be the end of sax (And all the other wind instruments I play). OR is it... HAs anyone else been here or similar?

I really F*** hope MIlandro doesn;t turn up to tell me to search the forum becase I am not in the mood! :D (plus I already did)
All the luck in the world to you.

Expect the best, prepare for the worse.
.
 

·
Registered
Tenor, alto, Bb Clarinet, Flute
Joined
·
2,604 Posts
Let’s hope it’s something they can remove without taking a lot of tissue. Your biggest worry now is to get yourself healthy.

I mentioned here once that I self-taught pretty much my first two or three years and that instead of tonguing I articulated in the back of my throat until I learned better. I used a sort of uh uh uh to stop and start the air stream. It’s not technically correct and you can never articulate as fast as tonguing but it is possible to play with a pleasing sound by starting and stopping notes in the back of the throat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
I had a similar scare but it was my lower lip. A big chunk was taken out. For some reason I didn't give much thought to the fact that it could have stopped my playing, although I knew that I wouldn't be able to play for a while. Am I just stupid, and optimist, or did acceptance and getting on with life just seem like the best option?

Life deals us all kind of s**t. Attitude can make many things into triumphs or tragedies. It's up to you how you face and recover from these things.

Wishing you all the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
We live in an era of one-armed violinists, amputees running on two prosthetics, video cameras and other measurement sensors attached to mouthpieces. There is so much ingenuity possible now, there is really no telling what sort of solutions may appear once you actually know the nature of any possible problem you end up having to solve.

Good luck and smooth sailing going forward.
 

·
Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2008-2017
Joined
·
2,292 Posts
It won't be the end because you will be alright. Hopefully you'll recover and by no means it has to be the end for playing. Go on. I really hope to hear good news from you.

Kindest regards from Mexico,

JI
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Sorry to hear about this, this is very serious, I offer you my sincere sympathy as sincere and as much as I have tried to offer help throughout these years to the people searching something, always taking time to actually suggest the threads that hey need and never saying only “ search “.

Be well.
Hopefully surgery will not be as destructive as you may now think.
just kidding milandro 💚 I said that cos I wanted you to reply
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Best wishes to you for a speedy recovery and good health afterwards.

Having survived stage 4 lymphoma myself, my advice is listen only to your oncologist and doctors regarding risks and prognosis. Don’t scare yourself unnecessarily by searching the stupid internet.
I hate the internet! Thanks, and congratulations to you. I know, I am mainly worried because the referral pathway I am on is for when the Drs suspect that you do have cancer, and not because they're just having a look.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I had a similar scare but it was my lower lip. A big chunk was taken out. For some reason I didn't give much thought to the fact that it could have stopped my playing, although I knew that I wouldn't be able to play for a while. Am I just stupid, and optimist, or did acceptance and getting on with life just seem like the best option?

Life deals us all kind of s**t. Attitude can make many things into triumphs or tragedies. It's up to you how you face and recover from these things.

Wishing you all the best.
so what hapened? Were you able to adapt your embouchure easy enough? I'm guessing so.... can you tell me more?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'm sorry that you must go through this terrifying situation. I hope that you have an oncology team (not a dentist).
Regardless of the treatment, you WILL continue to play your saxophone. You may encounter a learning curve, but you CAN do it. SOTW will continue to send you positive energy and we will pray for the best prognosis.
I had a dentist who fair play referred me straight away, but I have a "max fax" surgeon now, and I guess move on to oncology if it is a cancer situation.

Thanks for positive vibes, and to all the other well wishes, it means a lot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Someone very close to me had a cancerous lesion on their tongue. When they first noticed it, if it were lasered off right there and then, there may have never been any further consequences. But believing it was caused by biting/grinding, time went on until an initial biopsy was benign. Then dentists/oral surgeons bounced them around when it came back and ultimately became cancerous. They're not a wind player, and the lesion was on the side in the middle of the tongue. So when it came off with the margins... and the lymph nodes on the neck... the tongue was still functional. Different. Affected speech, but only someone who had known them prior would catch the difference. Radiation was an option as opposed to the cutting, but not taken given their situation.

So hopefully it's benign and not in a bad spot. But get it removed anyway so you don't have to deal with more vigorous treatment which would definitely affect your playing. Also make certain that you're treating with an oral surgeon with oncology experience.
thank you for sharing, sound advice
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top