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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The title almost says it all.

I stop at Lowes to see what I can make into a leak light.

How about a $2 extension cord cut off and soldered to a 20W halogen bulb?
No - too hot and if it breaks I'll get zapped or burned.

Then I find a 6 foot rope light for under $7.

The rope light comes home but is too thick at the end to fit into my clarinet.
I trim down the end and now it fits.

Upon inspection it seems light glows right through those white clarinet pads but I do find a few problem ones and fix by applying heat and reseating the pads.

WOW - the clarinet is playing much better.

How about my kid's Conn 50M Alto sax that needs $150 in repairs?
Light goes in and a few pads get reseated. A few keys get a bend here and there.
Now the thing plays GREAT! I should take it back from him but then he'd need a rental.

One thing I noticed since I haven't played it in a while is how kludgey the key work feels. I guess my Taiwanese E.M. Winston IS a much better horn but the Conn is built like a tank.

Now for my Evette & Schaeffer "Master Model" tenor.
It's been a little rough to play the past few years but works well enough.
WHAT'S THIS ?!?!? Two pads in the left hand G to C range are not fully closing. Thank you leak light.
Apply heat, reseat and - well, not quite as good the results I had on the other instruments but it is playing easier down to low C.
I'll spend some more time on it today.

My test of how well a sax is sealing is being able to play low Bb very softly.

I just wanted to share my story since things turned out so well.

It's almost as fun as getting a bunch of new horns.
 

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i managed the same thing with an old Keilworth stencil, i replaced most of the pads since they were real chewed up. it didn't play at all, i got a leaklight out and 20 minutes with a blowtorch and the light it played great.

congratulations!
it's almost addictive, im just buying my third sax to repair, properly, now i know what procedures to go through so i wont make the same mistakes i did before.
 

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Forum Contributor 2007-2012, Distinguished SOTW Te
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Keilwerth stencil? Did someone say Keilwerth stencil????? :)

I know its been said elsewhere, but I heartily recommend the Reg Thorpe repair book here: http://www.napbirt.org/cart/proddetail.asp?prod=OS-1019

I think that doing repairs on your main instrument on at least a minor level is something that should be taught in every music program, at least in college level if not high school. Too bad most Music Ed programs don't even touch on the subject! Good to hear stories like these!
 
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