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Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to focus on tenor for a while but i can't find a good mouthpiece that is suitable for me. I want to know if there is a small tip that allows me to not change my embouchure a lot. Help please.
 

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Maybe you can tell us what tenor mouthpiece you're currently using? And by "not change embouchure a lot", which mouthpiece(s) are you comparing to? IMHO small tip doesn't mean embouchure wouldn't change much; the beak profile and how much mpc to take in are more important factors.
 

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It seems logical to try to get set-ups on different saxes that minimize your embouchure changes. However, after trying this for a bunch of years, I and others have found out that you need to approach each size sax as a unique instrument in order to get the best results. Fingering and articulation can basically be the same, but your embouchure needs to change for each size sax. Same thing with other doubles like clarinet. You need to approach clarinet as if you are a primary clarinet player.

So what is your primary instument and what mouthpiece and reed are you now using?
 

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Yes, it is the RELATIVE difference in tip size between different size saxophones which matters. For example, an Otto-Link 6* for alto will have a smaller tip than an O-L tenor 6*....but, for the physical size of mouthpiece, the relationship will be similar.
 

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Yep,

This sounds like a reasonable goal, but in practice this is not really that big of a problem. After a while it become very easy to go from one sax to another without a second thought. Overall, you are using the same muscles in a similar configuration. Most players don't really have a problem.
 

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I have never had a problem with my alto, soprano, or bari embouchure but have struggled with Tenor and still continue to. I started on Alto 20 years ago & have played tenor for about 13 years, switching to it as my primary for the last 4.

I'm definitely getting there w/ tenor, but still am never as comfortable as on SAB.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I am using a Meyer 6 on my alto and using just a Java 2 1/2 reed. I'm trying to focus on my Tenor embouchure for a while but I understand what you means by approaching an instrument as it is my primary.
 

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I'm also trying to find the mouthpiece thats right for me as well that get me close to what I'm looking for so that I can do the rest myself but I have to do that but thanks for the advice everyone!
 

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I have never had a problem with my alto, soprano, or bari embouchure but have struggled with Tenor and still continue to. I started on Alto 20 years ago & have played tenor for about 13 years, switching to it as my primary for the last 4.

I'm definitely getting there w/ tenor, but still am never as comfortable as on SAB.
Tenor's my Bane, too!
 

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I am using a Meyer 6 on my alto and using just a Java 2 1/2 reed. I'm trying to focus on my Tenor embouchure for a while but I understand what you means by approaching an instrument as it is my primary.
Wouldn't it make sense to start with a Meyer 6 on Tenor? All I play anymore are Meyer 6's, HR and Metal, on all the different horns.
 

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Wouldn't it make sense to start with a Meyer 6 on Tenor? All I play anymore are Meyer 6's, HR and Metal, on all the different horns.

It's my experience that meyers don't work all that well on tenors, at least for me. That being said, I have a friend that plays tenor on a medium chamber meyer, and he sounds like he wants to. (And I used to play a link on alto)

All things being equal, a meyer on alto, and a link on tenor is a good place to start.
 

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It's my experience that meyers don't work all that well on tenors, at least for me. That being said, I have a friend that plays tenor on a medium chamber meyer, and he sounds like he wants to. (And I used to play a link on alto)

All things being equal, a meyer on alto, and a link on tenor is a good place to start.
I can agree that the Meyer 6 on the Tenor is toughest for me too, but I so seldom ever play Tenor that I don't have the money or time to try other mouthpieces. I don't even own a Tenor... :(

OP, if you have the money, go with the Link like Haki said. Also I think the Selmer C* is pretty much the easiest MPC to play.
 

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Lets get down to brass tacks here. You have already probably decided you will need to change your approach. Therefore, the first question is answered. Now the next important...and most important question: What sound are you after? There is no point in going through all the work if its not rewarding in the end.
 

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However, after trying this for a bunch of years, I and others have found out that you need to approach each size sax as a unique instrument in order to get the best results. Fingering and articulation can basically be the same, but your embouchure needs to change for each size sax. Same thing with other doubles like clarinet.
Not only are there embouchure changes, there are voicing differences, sometimes they seem quite alien from one another. It takes time and practice to be able to manipulate your embouchure AND voicing to adapt to each instrument on the fly.
 

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I like the old Brilharts and Meyers for tenor but the amazing ones are the Ricos. I would say to start with a Graftonite B5 or a Metalite M5. Really great mouthpieces in the $18-30 range.
 

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Something like a Soloist with a smallish tip opening can be good on tenor. Actually a Link with a small tip could be good. Then get a reed to match so you have the kind of resistance that feels a bit similar to your alto set up. I agree though that embouchure and voicing is still different between different saxes.
 
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