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Discussion Starter #1
I play alto, been doing for 6 odd years and I love every minute of it. I play a Buescher TH&C, phil-tone Meyer and I achieve what I'd call a fairly big round but quite bright sound and I'm at the point where I love my sound and the only thing I ever will change is my reed (hopefully). I love Cannonball Adderley's tone, its what I'm going for, just as a reference.

So I've never really picked up a tenor before, besides the odd occasion when I borrow a buds for a couple hours. I've been debating whether or not I should take a plunge and get right into it and take some time with the learning curve or just keep honing my skills on alto for a bit longer.
Thing is, Stan Getz has my favourite tenor tone period dot.
But I consider these tones as complete contrasts, so I was wondering if it's possible to get a Getz esque tone on tenor while still maintaining keeping my alto the same.

Will one negatively affect the other??

Any body else been through the same deal?

Is it worth picking up a tenor before I become too familiar and just try to get the two opposite sounds?

And also I remember hearing a quote by Coltrane "We`d all sound like that if we could" (In reference to Getz). So if he liked that tone so much, why didn't he try to emulate it, his sound is nothing like Getz's (IMO). In my experience and what I've heard, your sound comes from what you want to sound like, generally a product of your influences and what that sound in your head is. How come he didn't go for it.
Was he so engrained that he couldn't change?
anybody had the same thing?

Any thoughts??

Cheers all
 

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I remember hearing the quote from Coltrane regarding Getz' tone also. I think Coltrane, however, was involved in finding his sound more than emulating Getz' tone. Like you mentioned, our own personal sound is and should be a culmination of our influences and the tonal conception we subsequently develop. I think that while Coltrane loved Getz' sound, his voice developed differently as a result of who he was, his physical characteristics, and how he played. Besides, Coltrane's tone is absolutely gorgeous at times, and seething with passion at other times. In my opinion, he was one of the most expressive players to ever live.

As to your concerns regarding playing tenor and alto, and more specifically, working to develop different sounds on each, I don't think there's a problem there unless you are planning on playing tenor with a double-lip embouchure like I believe Getz used. I do think, however, that you should work at developing a more personalized sound on each instrument, resulting from a combination of your influences and the personal physical characteristics of your mouth shape, oral cavity, teeth, etc... I also think that you should be open to allowing your tonal conception to evolve over the years. There is, however, a lot to be said for developing personal, yet different, voices on each instrument. After all, that's why we learn to play both alto and tenor.

Randy
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I've never had any problem with having different sound concepts for alto and tenor. Some players (Joshua Redman comes to mind) have very similar tones on alto and tenor but I don't see why it should be difficult to have different ones, as long as you have the dedication to practice both of them enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
As to your concerns regarding playing tenor and alto, and more specifically, working to develop different sounds on each, I don't think there's a problem there unless you are planning on playing tenor with a double-lip embouchure like I believe Getz used. I do think, however, that you should work at developing a more personalized sound on each instrument, resulting from a combination of your influences and the personal physical characteristics of your mouth shape, oral cavity, teeth, etc... I also think that you should be open to allowing your tonal conception to evolve over the years. There is, however, a lot to be said for developing personal, yet different, voices on each instrument. After all, that's why we learn to play both alto and tenor.
The double lip? You mean, no teeth on top? I've never heard that before, I've seen that he takes a lot of mouthpiece (album cover of For Musicians only comes to mind) but I didn't know that.

Just approach them for what they are...two different instruments. Just keep working to make the sound that is in your head.
Yeah, was my original thought, I'm glad that others have had success!

Thanks all
Cheers
 
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