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Hi, I'm new to the forum, I played tenor sax for almost 5 years I think, then for a year and a half I didn't play and now I'm playing again hopefully with no stop this time.

The question is about how to take care of the sax, when I first started I remember after everytime I practice I'd always clean it with a swab, i'd put little pieces of rolling paper in each pad that is always pressed, clean the neck also with another swab, the mouthpiece with water (it's plastic) and the reed (I'll make another post about this because I have a few questions too) with water and then dry it.
But I didn't know if that was absolutely necessary, I mean, to clean it like that every day I play, even if I'd play again the next day

Now, I also remember this as one of the reasons I wasn't that motivated to play every day, to do all that everytime. This days I do want to play everyday but I still don't know if you should clean it and dissarm it, again, even if I play the next day.

TL;DR: Whats your daily routine when practising and after it?
 

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I take mine to pieces, pull a swab through the crook and wipe the mouthpiece clean to try to prevent build up of grot, I'm partially successful, pull a swab through the horn and leave it all to dry out for a few hours. All I'm doing is removing excess moisture from the horn. It takes less than five minutes. When the mouthpiece, ebonite, gets a build of of crap over the months I soak it overnight in diet Coke, any diet drink will do, and wash it out the next day.What you describe is probably better but seems excessive to me, I've never individually dried the pads and will give them a clean from time to time as needed.
 

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Most people do no more than swab. Key leaves are probably just as effective as paper and a little less expense and trouble in the long run. I personally don't bother, and have to replace those pads every few decades. Your paper regimen probably gets you a few more decades out of your pads and of course less sticking to deal with.

My problem is at 3 AM at the end of a long gig, all I want to do is throw the horn in the case as quickly as possible and go home. I'll take the trade off of replacing pads more often. If I'm just practicing at home, I don't swab or disassemble at all. I just set the horn on the stand, and remove just the mouthpiece and reed and rinse them. The rest of the horn dries naturally.

In the threads Milandro linked, you'll find every possible cleaning regimen, so take your pick. If the drudgery of cleaning is killing your motivation, then I can assure you that even the worst neglect won't destroy your horn in your lifetime. You'll just have to replace a few pads more often and have a little more sticking. I think skipping the paper or replacing with key leaves will be fine.
 

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The question is about how to take care of the sax, when I first started I remember after everytime I practice I'd always clean it with a swab, i'd put little pieces of rolling paper in each pad that is always pressed, clean the neck also with another swab, the mouthpiece with water (it's plastic) and the reed (I'll make another post about this because I have a few questions too) with water and then dry it.
Welcome back to playing!

Attitude can be everything - rather than call it a drudgery, consider it a time to show care and appreciation for your horn.

That said, you may be caring overmuch. I have been playing 50+ years, and my horns do well with "only" the following post-play care: Remove the ligature and reed, wipe reed dry and place in reed case to dry flat; remove the neck, take off the mouthpiece, and swab the neck; place the mouthpiece in a mouthpiece pouch, and store in in the case; swab the horn and lay it in its case; place neck strap in case and LATCH THE CASE.

My rule about cases is that if the lid is shut, the latches are shut - that prevents the possibility of picking up the case, and dumping the horn on the floor.

I do rinse my mouthpiece at least weekly - brushing if it needs it.

Enjoy the music, and thank your horn for being a part of it.
 

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My regime is to detach the neck and swab it a couple times with a Hodge silk swab, then use an H.W. pad saver on the body a few times until the inner tenon receiver feels mostly dry. I usually click the keys closed once or twice against the stationary pad saver so it can absorb extra moisture, but never twist or move the pad saver against the pads, lest they wear out faster. Then I gently wipe both neck and body with a soft cotton cloth to get any fingerprints or stray condensation off the lacquer.

The neck is left to dry in the open air somewhere safe, like a table or drawer, while the horn goes into a Saxrax stand until it dries out fully. Sometimes I'll put it back in the case after several hours, zipping up or latching the case closed, as Dr. G. recommends.

Usually I run cold water through the mouthpiece, then dry it with a paper towel, but sometimes I just let it dry on its own. Gotta be careful not to drop the slippery wet mouthpiece. The reed gets a quick dunk in water to rinse off the saliva, and after the excess liquid is wiped off, is placed in a flat plastic reed case.
 

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My routine is similar to those above and I go through it every time I practice or play.

However, at home I keep the sax in its case and I leave the case open for about a day for air to circulate. The neck and mouthpieces are not tucked away - air can circulate around them as well.

If you have kids or critters and no "music room" to keep locked, then locking the sax in its case is safest.
 

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Almost forgot--if you do use a pad saver to mop up moisture, don't leave it in the sax, but remove it afterwards to let the air circulate. The H.W. pad savers are the only ones I know of that don't shed and leave stray material behind in your horn.
 

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My procedures are quite minimal but have served adequately for many years with no problems.

I think it is important to have low barrier to pick up the sax and play on a moments notice. Good hygiene and maintenance is also important, but a secondary priority. What good is a spotless perfectly clean sax sitting on a case, if you ain't playing the damn thing.

Long-term dampness is the greatest threat for your own, and your saxophone's wellbeing, so I always take great care to allow each sax-related component to have regular opportunity to dry under good ventilation. That's the foundation of of all the care, or lack of care I take:

Reeds: Rinse under running water after each play, or at least once a day, if feeling lazy. Sometimes I leave it on the mouthpiece if I think I might play again soon, and then forget it. In that case, same operation before playing. Usually, in addition to rinsing, I gently rub them with baby toothbrush. It's not the end of the world to neglect some of that every now and then. I store the in-use reeds always on glass surface, in open air to let them dry straight.

Mouthpiece: Rinse and quick scrub with baby toothbrush under running water at least once a day. Sometimes I forget, I don't stress about that. I try to get into the habit of removing mouthpiece after each play to keep the cork in good shape, but often forget.

Sax & neck: Swab about every other day, and that's about it. I leave them on the stand to dry and to be readily available for playing in a moments notice. I try to remove the neck every night to allow the sax dry better, but often forget. I rinse the neck under running water about once a week, taking care to not wet the octave key pad. Quick wipe for the sax exterior with damp cloth about every other week.

For those saxes that have "closed by default pads" with sticky tendencies, I wedge those keys open for the night, but often forget. I use old reeds as a wedge, not touching the pad, but between key arms and body.
 

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My rule about cases is that if the lid is shut, the latches are shut - that prevents the possibility of picking up the case, and dumping the horn on the floor.
+1. Probably the most important point made on this thread even if it has nothing to do with cleaning the sax. Never, ever, for even an instant close the case without latching (or zipping up) the case.

I learned that lesson many years ago, the hard way. Picked up my case by the handle, not realizing I hadn't latched it, and the horn tumbled to the floor. Cost me several hundred dollars at the time! But I never made that mistake again...
 

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+1. Probably the most important point made on this thread even if it has nothing to do with cleaning the sax. Never, ever, for even an instant close the case without latching (or zipping up) the case.

I learned that lesson many years ago, the hard way. Picked up my case by the handle, not realizing I hadn't latched it, and the horn tumbled to the floor. Cost me several hundred dollars at the time! But I never made that mistake again...
Same here, I was lucky enough that i could break the fall with my foot so there was only a scratch but ... lesson learned, until next time (hopefully not)
 

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+1. Probably the most important point made on this thread even if it has nothing to do with cleaning the sax. Never, ever, for even an instant close the case without latching (or zipping up) the case.

I learned that lesson many years ago, the hard way. Picked up my case by the handle, not realizing I hadn't latched it, and the horn tumbled to the floor. Cost me several hundred dollars at the time! But I never made that mistake again...
I saw a guy do that once with a surveying total station instrument that was easily worth two Mark VIs. Big oops.
 
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