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Model 139 as listed in the 1938 Buescher catalog.




By the late 1940 rollout of the Big B alto and tenor, the 139 has been stricken from the ranks.
Bringing up the low end, like Papa Mills with the Mills Brothers, is good old split-bell model 129.

 

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Thumbing thru Buescher materials of the late 1930s, I actually get the opposite impression from maddenma, that the Buescher sax most widely accepted in name bands was the 129 bari. I suspect it cost less than the market leader, Conn, and was popular for that reason with alto doublers. Still a very nice playing horn, and a good value on the vintage market today.
 

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Correction on prices: In 1938 the Buescher 129 cost $165 in lacquer, exclusive of case. So did the Conn 12M.

Model No. 129 was used way back for Buescher baris. The final split bell version - front F key, curved E, New Aristocrat type pinkie table - did in fact emerge in 1934, as maddenma said.
 

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Not handy. Might be available under Museum / Publications at saxophone.org.
 

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The cases were their profit point. I don't know that I'd pay 2013 dollars for those lightly padded, formed plywood cases, especially considering how poorly they hold up with age and moisture. One place modern materials mean a lot.
 

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Pete, a C melody (or other off-model sax) could easily have sat in back inventory for several years in the 1930s until an order came in. I should think your C body was made in 1930, serialed, then did not sell until 1934 or later, when it was finished, engraved in the style in use at the time, padded, corked and assembled.

My Buescher C melody is also #256k, but silver-plated and engraved in "The Buescher" style in use from about 1928. How long they did that style is an open question, but I've seen it on baris up to #268k (1934).

My #256k Buescher straight soprano is the latest numbered I know of and may have stayed in inventory as late as 1960. It's engraved in the Gothic letter style used up till 1927 - but it's done with an electric tool in a very wide stroke.
 

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Juan or Mark or somebody, tell us more about "the gov contract in 37" and how it could have turned the fortunes of Buescher.

Experts have a way of dropping the most fascinating details off hand, then failing to elaborate. I guess that's how they stay experts.
 

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Buescher supplied the service bands, but I don't know that they did so exclusively for any length of time.
My 264k True-Tone tenor is marked USQMC (Quartermaster Corps = Army). My 285k Aristocrat tenor is marked U.S. (also Army).
 

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(Ra/Bue)scher

It is manifest destiny. :cool:
 

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Dang...tuning fixes are a thing, altho on open C# it can be tricky. Sharp or flat?
 
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