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Discussion Starter #1
My soprano is not a Bb, but a A pitch. Well, not quite but it's a semi-tone flat. If I jam the mouthpiece extremely far in, it gets up to Bb, but that shouldn't be necessary.
Any idea why this happens?

(soprano is a Buescher TT and mouthpiece Otto Link)

Cheers
 

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Re: B-pitch soprano

First off, it would be in A rather than B if it is flat. Is the mouthpiece bottoming out on the end of the horn or is it just not going far enough in due to the cork? If it is hitting the inside chamber of the mouthpiece, you will need to change mouthpieces. If it is a matter of the cork, just sand it down but not too much because grease will make it looser. If the end of the shank hits the octave key, the mouthpiece will need to be shortened. I have a TT soprano and it is just fine....I end up with about a half inch of cork showing.
Some of my sopranos are in tune with the mouthpiece really far in. Don't worry how it looks as the pitch is more important.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Re: B-pitch soprano

True, I mean A-pitch, thanks.
It's not the cork, but it hits the inside chamber of the mouthpiece.
I'll have get a new mouthpiece, though I thought they were all pretty much the same pitch-wise.
Cheers


EDITED ORIGINAL POST
 

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Re: B-pitch soprano

Does it say "low pitch" on the back below the thumbrest? all modern saxes are A440 or low pitch
Could it be higher pitch?
 

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Re: B-pitch soprano

Could it be that you need to go the other way? Pull out alot, and if the cork will not support this, then the cork is the problem.
 

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Re: B-pitch soprano

Sorry misread your entry. forget about my last entry. I was thinking the horn was sharp not flat when you said B pitch. A high pitch sax is only good as a wall hanger unless you want to play alone.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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If I jam the mouthpiece extremely far in, it gets up to Bb, but that shouldn't be necessary.
Well, really it is necessary. The mouthpiece needs to go on as far as necessary to be in tune.

But a big part of creating the right pitch is the player's embouchure, what happens when other players, ideally experienced players and/or your teacher, play the horn?
 

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Re: B-pitch soprano

It's not the cork, but it hits the inside chamber of the mouthpiece.
I'll have get a new mouthpiece, though I thought they were all pretty much the same pitch-wise.
Yes, you may have to get a new mouthpiece if yours won't go in far enough. Sometimes we even saw off a little bit off the neck… not as bad as it sounds. This is common on some older baritones that won't play in tune otherwise.
 

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+1 to all the advice about getting a different mouthpiece. I have two TT sopranos (straight) from 1928 and both require short mouthpieces that are almost down to the upper-octave-vent rib. I have some soprano mouthpieces that won't go on that far because their barrels are too shallow (meaning that the top of the horn's neck butts up against the top of the mouthpiece's barrel).

The Selmer Super Session pieces are short enough to shove on far enough to come to pitch. For longer pieces (like Selmer S-80, Link STM, Morgan Vintage, etc.), I've had their barrels shortened to match the overall length of the Super Sessions. DAVE
 

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My soprano is not a Bb, but a A pitch. Well, not quite but it's a semi-tone flat. If I jam the mouthpiece extremely far in, it gets up to Bb, but that shouldn't be necessary.
Any idea why this happens?
Why? The mouthpiece volume is large compared to what the horn needs. Regardless of how the cork looks, if the mouthpiece is on far enough and the horn plays in tune with itself, you're golden.

FWIW, when I replace the neck cork on my horns, I trim the cork such that no cork shows when my preferred mouthpiece is in its spot. It drives other people crazy...

If it works, that's all that matters. The amount of exposed cork is arbitrary.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for all the comments.

To address a few:
I'm not bothered by how it looks jammed in.
There's nothing wrong with the cork, in fact the mouthpiece can sit nicely anywhere on the cork.
Pete Thomas: it's definitely not an embouchere problem.
The problem, as many have understood well, is that the neck ends up in the barrel because it's jammed too far down.
It's my friend's mouthpiece and he had the same problem on his soprano (I don't know what soprano it is), until he bought another mouthpiece.
Cheers
 

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The problem, as many have understood well, is that the neck ends up in the barrel because it's jammed too far down.
The PROBLEM is that the volume of the mouthpiece is too large.

A RESULT of the problem is that the mouthpiece has to be jammed on the horn to reach correct pitch.

The SOLUTION is a different mouthpiece with smaller interior volume.

Have you tried your friend's other mouthpiece(s)? When you find one that works, take a look in the interior to get a sense of the differences.
 

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Or too large ???
Gads! Thanks, Pete. I addressed that earlier in the thread and was trying to recap the info this morning whilst the coffee was brewing. Big mistake - edited and corrected for posterity now.

Cheers.

I need more coffee...
 

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Thanks a lot for the comments. I ahd been dealing with the same issue (semi-tone flat). I just sanded the cork off a little and push the mouthpiece farther in. Now I am very very close to the tones. Thanks again.
 
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