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Discussion Starter #1
So, I've heard of big named necks for the multiple saxes, and I hear of "increased performance", or "amazing resonance", or "They do absolutely nothing."



Which of these am I to believe? I don't have many bari necks at my disposal to try out, so I figure I'd ask you guys =P. What's the difference, if there is one?

Thanks =]
 

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A different neck design (so long as it is compatable) makes a sizable difference in how a horn plays and sounds. It can lessen or increase resistance and alter the tone in a big way. Its not just a sound the player hears, I have had people who are not musicians provide me with feedback in regards to different neck choices. I cant tell you generally what the difference is because it depends on which neck on which horn.

In a nutshell, believing different necks make no difference is like saying all mouthpieces sound the same. Even different necks of the same design can make a difference due to construction tollerances.
 

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Necks definately make a difference on baritone-and all the other saxophones. I have played on many different baritone necks and they all have different properties just like mouthpieces. Karsten Gloger makes beautiful necks that can open up the sound of the horn. I have played a bunch of mark VI necks on my horn and they all have slightly different tones and colors.
 

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Last Saturday I tried a Selmer Super Action 80 bari neck on my Yamaha 52 bari and liked it quite a bit. A little more resistance, but with more even tone, better upper register intonation, and (not so shockingly) a more focused, french sound. Next paycheck I'm going to buy that neck and I'm now convinced that a Yamaha 52 bari with a Selmer neck plays, sounds, and responds just as well as any Yamaha 62.
 

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I tried a 62 neck on a 23 alto and noticed a much richer tone with a lot less resistance. really lessened the brightness and mellowed the low tones.big improvement for just a few bucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Heh, cool, thanks guys. I guess I may pick up SOME kind of neck when I get some cash ^_^.
 

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Blindside; interesting you're playing a Level Air. I hope it's one of the original models and not the recent Babbitt version which is basically a Runyon. The originals are actually excellent for all kinds of bari playing. I keep an 8* for smoother playing or section work (as in sax section). For horn section or solo playing, I use a '60s Berg Larsen hard rubber 130/1 with a Plasticover #3 on my Martin. This is the most incredible bari piece I have ever played, and the set-up is not nearly as stiff as it sounds. Of course, I have to find the right Plasticover, as some of them at that strength are too hard. The thing about the Level Air is, it gives the best low-end you can get on a bari - huge, booming bell notes that will rattle the PA system. The Berg is louder and much better up top, which makes it better for the 'boo-wops' in R&B work and any kind of solo or jazz playing. The Berg (and any other non-metal piece) is appreciably lighter in weight, which always helps on bari. Prior to the advent of the Guardala 'Laser-Trimmed' mouthpieces, the old Level Air was known as a very consistent piece. In other words, they all blow. You just need to find out which facing is for you. In Brilharts generally, the * facing is the shorter facing with the same tip opening as without the star. I played a 9* on tenor for 23 years and a 5* for some time before that. For some reason, I grew away from the Level Air on anything but bari, playing Guardalas now. I recently played a 'horn section' gig with the Level Air just for the heck of it. I missed the Berg because the Brilhart is just a little too 'tame' for that high-volume environment, but didn't change on the gig. Bari for me is an alternate toy since I'm really a tenor man, but since I started on bari in school I always have had a soft spot for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
1saxman said:
Blindside; interesting you're playing a Level Air. I hope it's one of the original models and not the recent Babbitt version which is basically a Runyon. The originals are actually excellent for all kinds of bari playing. I keep an 8* for smoother playing or section work (as in sax section). For horn section or solo playing, I use a '60s Berg Larsen hard rubber 130/1 with a Plasticover #3 on my Martin. This is the most incredible bari piece I have ever played, and the set-up is not nearly as stiff as it sounds. Of course, I have to find the right Plasticover, as some of them at that strength are too hard. The thing about the Level Air is, it gives the best low-end you can get on a bari - huge, booming bell notes that will rattle the PA system. The Berg is louder and much better up top, which makes it better for the 'boo-wops' in R&B work and any kind of solo or jazz playing. The Berg (and any other non-metal piece) is appreciably lighter in weight, which always helps on bari. Prior to the advent of the Guardala 'Laser-Trimmed' mouthpieces, the old Level Air was known as a very consistent piece. In other words, they all blow. You just need to find out which facing is for you. In Brilharts generally, the * facing is the shorter facing with the same tip opening as without the star. I played a 9* on tenor for 23 years and a 5* for some time before that. For some reason, I grew away from the Level Air on anything but bari, playing Guardalas now. I recently played a 'horn section' gig with the Level Air just for the heck of it. I missed the Berg because the Brilhart is just a little too 'tame' for that high-volume environment, but didn't change on the gig. Bari for me is an alternate toy since I'm really a tenor man, but since I started on bari in school I always have had a soft spot for it.

Beautiful horn you have there, and yeah, I have the newer model. I've gone back to using my Runyon Custom though, because I prefer the HR over metal anyways (Not to mention I have the newer Level Air as opposed to your older one), and my Runyon is a bit bigger facing than my Level Air (7 for the Brilhart, it's pretty small). I get a bigger sound out of the Custom, and It's actually...well, just enough. You're right about the tameness for a high-volume environment though, there was only so much I could get out of it during a solo without it pinching the reed.


Thanks for your input! =]
 

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The Runyon Custom is the only other mouthpiece I like on my bari other than the ones I play. I tried several of them before I lucked onto the Berg. I liked a #10 Runyon Custom Spoiler (without the spoiler), either Amber or Red. I still think I should have kept that one. When you find a mouthpiece that blows, you keep it.
I agree with you 100% - stick to a slimline hard rubber or Delrin piece if you find one that blows.
I'll never forget the night I walked into a Mars Music several years ago for some reeds. I saw this beautiful Jupiter Artist soprano with silver neck, so I tried it. They had a Dukoff D7 in the case too, so I played the soprano with that. It was a magic combination - smooth, in-tune, thick, loud, everything. I left, but decided to go back the next day and just buy the mouthpiece, which was on sale, to play on my Woodwind soprano. I got it, brought it home, and it stunk on my horn. I was not in the market for a $1400 soprano then, but that was one of those chance set-ups that you remember for a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Oh yeah man, that's true as it gets. The custom really works well with my ybs-52. Take a look at my youtube (in my signature), and listen to "but not for me", I'm playing bari on that one with my Runyon.

But yeah, I still want to find something perfect, but I'll always be searching for that. Always.
 

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Aftermarket Bari Neck

I picked up a brand name bari neck on ebay in hopes that it would open up the sound of my B901. Surprisingly, it didn't sound that much different. I have noticed significant changes with necks on altos/tenors.

Is it possible that the realative size of the bari neck to the rest of the horn minimizes the impact to the sound?
 

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blindside398 said:
So, I've heard of big named necks for the multiple saxes, and I hear of "increased performance", or "amazing resonance", or "They do absolutely nothing."
In trying different necks, I have experienced all three of those responses when trying different necks.

To my observation the two things that make the most difference are the inlet bore at the tip and the mass per surface area of the neck tube. Octave pip bore and length, too.

Of course, the volume and length as well as the pip location need to have the proper relationship to the horn.

As far as the bari, you are right on about the neck - though I think the inlet bore should still play a factor. My experiences are primarily with alto and tenor, though I do have a couple necks for my bari that could be messed with to see what happens.
 

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I recently bought a Yani bronze neck for my B-991. I´m fairly certain that it produces a broader sound than the standard neck - not a vast difference, granted, but a difference. Besides, not an expensive mistake to make.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It's been my experience that everything Yani + bari = better than others ^_^. I recently played a GREAT yani bari, and I was just blown away. It kicked the hell out of my ybs-52, and that me sad. I think my ybs still has some small leaks anyways, but oh well. It makes me sad that that horn is a school owned at a very...run down school in my county, and the people there won't take proper care of it. The bari player actually told me it was brand new that year, and that the bari was so messed up he actually had to find alternate fingerings to play everything...talk about a horror story!
 

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Necks

I agree that necks can make a noticeable difference on a horn.
I have recently picked up a Barone Copper neck for my MK VI Tenor. It makes the horn more free-blowing, I have a better subtone, and high range. I think it makes the horn more responsive as well. What I haven't done yet is to record myself using the stock neck vs the Barone. The tone is different, but I haven't fully decided yet which is "better".
In terms of necks on Bari saxes I've wondered how much they might make a difference as they are such a small physical part of the big horn. I'm going to assume that they can make a difference as they seem to for altos and tenors. Assuming can be dangerous I realize...I have a Couf Superba 1 Bari sax that came with a Yamaha neck instead of the original. I do wonder what a different neck would do on my Couf. Does anyone know if Bari necks are pretty much universal? It does work with a Yamaha neck so perhaps it would work with a Selmer or Barone...does that make sense? Does anyone have experience with Couf Baris and necks?
 
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