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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just recently I got a selmer series 3 64 tenor sax and I am still playing on the stock C* mouthpiece. Now I play in a ska band and because of the nature of that music I'm obviously being over shadowed/blended into the electrics and the heavy trumpet/trombone. That leads me to my question, what's a good metal mouthpiece that can cut threw the rest of the band to let me be heard?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the suggestions guys. I'm sorry I didn't mention a price range, but I was thinking around 150-200$ for the mouthpiece. Unfortunetly this leaves the Guardala's out, which is a shame because I know how good people say they are.
 

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bobilbob,
Don't sacrifice tone quality just for the sake of "projection". Often times, saxophonists play on mouthpieces that are brighter, which in turn, raises the ceiling, so they think that they're actually "projecting" better. In reality, you're losing a warm, full sound in the process. At the risk of creating a heated argument, why don't you get a mouthpiece that you enables you to create YOUR sound, and then spend a few more $ on a decent mic. If you have your heart set on a metal mouthpiece, then find a good Otto Link - maybe a 7-7*. You don't need a huge tip opening for projection, that will only give you a "one-dimensional" sound. Find something comfortable that you can be expressive on - dynamics! Don't rule out hard rubber - Lambersons, Morgans, Otto Links, rubber Berg's - these can ALL work in ANY setting - it's the player, not the gear. I guess what I'm saying is, find a mouthpiece that's comfortable and versatile, and then let the mic do the work.
 

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Me again, sorry.
More important than volume is presence. You only can get that when you have a good and stable tone. Use your air and not the baffle.
A good sound is the first point. The sound engineer will like you..........
I play on an older Otto Link 7 with 2 1/2 or medium reads. It is loud enough for everything. And I can play classic on it, too. Be flexible with a good tone.
P.S.: The classical approach is the best.........
 

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I've played a Morgan Excalibur (8EL) for years and recently a Lamberson 7SB on hardcore rock and roll and R&B with 2 or more guitars. Just played in a bar last nite with bass, two guitars and a B3 and a drummer with 5 cymbals and a full set using the Lamberson on my old King...didn't need a mic until the second set when everything got louder and the guitarists had started drinking (pretty unprofessional...) btw, these are HR pieces both!!!

Until I got the Lamberson, I used a Dukoff 7D silverite (recently had it refaced by Mojo and I might start playing it again regularly as he fixed all the things I didn't like). Also a good choice for a piece that cuts without sacrificing tonal core.
 

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Just noticed that you said you're still playing the C*. I would recommend that you not go to a high baffle metal piece directly, but move to something a little more versatile. You're playing on an extreme classical piece designed for chamber music IMHO. I can't imagine a better next step than something like a Morgan 7EL or 8EL...if you get it from junkdude, then you will get a virgin handfaced piece (within your budget) that is reed friendly. The problem with buying a Link or a Lakey or Dukoff or any of the machine faced pieces is they are so variable with marginal quality control. Your next piece may not be your last, so if you were one of my students, I would recommend taking a moderate step that is a 'sure thing'...easy to play, quite a bit more open, but not extreme; it will not take a lot of practice to feel comfortable with this piece, and it is surely capable of competing in a ska band.
 

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bobilbob, I wouldn't count the Links out until you've tried one. I've had great luck with them, and have found 3 great playing ones right out of the box (maybe I'm just REALLY lucky :roll: ). For tenor, I'm really fond of the NY Tonemasters. Maybe it's just me, but I actually think that it's easier to play with a LARGER tip opening. Mine is an 8* and is easy to play and control at ALL VOLUMES in ALL REGISTERS. I think that it would work great with a ska band. You can also look into the Rovner Deep-V, which plays very similiarly to the Link. I think that the Rovner has just a bit more buzz due to to bigger window. Both are priced in the $150-$200 range, so you won't have to hurt the old checkbook too much.
 

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Just my opinion. It should be noted that I've only played on one Deep V that belongs to a friend of mine. He is the Rovner expert and said that it was very different from the other Rovners that he has played. This particular Deep V played like my NY 8*. Blasted manufacturing inconsistancies. Definatly worth trying both out.
 

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I have found that some mouthpieces, such as the guardala king and super king have small chambers, making them sound thin. For your pricerange, and in your situation, i would suggest a Metal Merg Larsen , with any tip openting that feels comfortable and a medium baffle. I play a Berg, and it can project well. It also can be used for different situations as well. It is a good rock mouthpiece, and you can choose the brightness.
The otto link is also good, but i fing them too dark.
 
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