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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone, i'm playing a Lebayle LR II, and its wonderful. However, because my classic formation, my upper notes produce too much high harmonics, and I would like too now if a ligature could help me having less of these harmonics.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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A different mouthpiece would solve the problem, a ligature doesn't really affect the sound. A new mouthpiece or refacing will make all the difference.
 

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Pete Thomas said:
A different mouthpiece would solve the problem, a ligature doesn't really affect the sound. A new mouthpiece or refacing will make all the difference.

Ligatures change the sound more than you think.
 

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awholley said:
A Rovner dark will have a greater effect in the direction you want to go than anything else out there.

Alan
Agreed. I have switched from Rovner ligatures to Vandoren Optimum, because I did not like the harmonic robbing characteristic of the Rovner.

A Rovner Dark would be a good choice.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all for your answers.
Countspatula: i don't wanna change my tenor reed, it give me the sound i want, but because my formation, I'm used to produce a lot of harmonics, and i think it can't be undone.
 

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I didn't mean you should, sorry if it sounded like that. If you like your setup then practice. A lot of that sound comes from you, you know? :)
 

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I agree on the Rovner (especially real leather ones), I have decided against them for this reason. Of course a subtoning embouchure, in combination with a ebonite large piece, would work wonders and have a much more impressive impact. Also a soft pressure plate (some ligatures have a choice) could help a little.
 

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CountSpatula said:
You'd have a better chance changing your sound by changing reeds.
No one really should have to do this unless they are swithching mouthpiece facings drastically. I have three ligatures that I own each one helps produce a different sound. I have a rovner dark (the original ones that were released back in the late 80's and early 90's) yes, there is a difference. I have an Olegature and a Selmer metal ligature non-inverted. Out of the three I use the Selmer for all of my classical playing. It is the only ligature that I have found that will give me all of the colors in the harmonic spectrum that I need. I'm talking slight little differences that takes years to develop the concept of what that would even sound like. You live in texas and are 18 I teach, perform and clinic all around Texas, I know that most students your age haven't even begun work on harmonics much less understand what they full harmonic spectrum on each note is, trust me a Ligature can drastically change your sound. In no way am I trying to belittle you, I just know how the music education system in Texas works.
 

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I personally don't think ligatures change much of anything in my sound. If anything, it changes response for me. It doesn't really matter too much to me though. If I needed to use rubber bands, I would. Doesn't sound drastically different from my Olegature. I've tried out tons of ligatures for fun. None have really made THAT big a difference. At least, none that made me want to go out and buy a new one. The only reason I have an olegature is because I think it looks sweet on my mouthpiece. It's starting to turn a little green though ...

Seriously though, don't get caught up in the hype. They make a difference, but a very subtle one. If the solution you are looking for is a subtle one, then by all means go for it.
 

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I have a blind poll on my site using different ligs and although there is a difference and I can hear it I wouldn't say it is drastic. I would say there are slight differences. If you check it out the poll let me know if you can hear a difference. I agree with the advice about the Rovner helping mellow out the higher harmonics.
 

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Rovner Darks are strange birds. I've found them muffling on certain pieces, but liberating on others. Good to have around in a pinch in case something busts. But if muffling is darkening, then yeah, it can happen. Doesn't explain the liberating part though...
 

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Ligatures generally, in my experience, don't make much of an audible (to a listener) difference in sound, except for the Rovner designs that feature fabric against the reed (all of them except the EDII, I think), which are super dark. To my ear, they make dark mouthpieces sound muffled and bland, but they can work wonders on brighter ones, since they cut a tiny bit of brightness out of the sound.
 

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El Spot,

Sorry for arriving late to this conversation...just returned from vacation.

I have two suggestions:

1.) I know that you were not warm to the suggestion of trying a different cut of reed. But, a thick cut reed -- more of a classical type of reed -- with more wood in the heart may work wonders for your sound. I'd suggest an Alexander Classique or a Gonzales. The quality of the cane makes a significant contribution to the quality of one's sound. These two reeds are made from especially high quality cane.

2.) If you're set on not changing reeds the only other suggestion I have is to try a Vandoren Klassik string ligature. They only come in clarinet and alto saxophone sizes. However, the alto version works perfectly fine for me on tenor. I've raved about this ligature on other threads. It's made a world of difference for me....and I've tried TONS of different ligatures. The concenption I had of a string ligature was it would overly darken my sound like a Rovner Dark. But, man was I surprised when I first tried one...at the suggestion of a classical clarinet buddy. I quickly discovered that it added a whole new dimention to my sound on clarinet and tenor. Much bigger sound, more robust and vibrant, and a greater level of projection. Totally amazing differences! The only place I know that sells the Klassik string lig for alto in the US is 1stopclarinet.com. You might find one more easily in France. It's definitely worth a try!

Good luck, Roger
 
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