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Discussion Starter #1
Ladies and Gentlemen,

After 20 years waiting for a chance ($$$ and Time):mrgreen:.I finally got my first sax which is a BW Soprano (Bronze).

Well,I have to study by myself since I work offshore in a monthly rotation. I have had 4 classes so far with a teacher and I also learned a lot reading in the internet...

I Have ordered few books in the amazon: The Complete Saxophone Player ,Saxophone Manual: The step-by-step guide to set-up, care and maintenance,Learn as You Play Saxophone: Tutor Book (Learn as You Play Series),101 Saxophone Tips: Stuff All the Pros Know and Use, Tipbook Saxophone: The Complete Guide,Absolute Beginners: Alto Saxophone,The art of Saxophone playing,Developing a personal saxophone sound...All these books are in the way now.Maybe is too much material for reading but I'm eager to learn and play something reasonable in a short period...I'm already playing the introduction notes for the summertime.

What I'd like is a guide program for study step by step from the very beginning, daily exercises,etc... I'm also studying music theory at the same time and still getting along with the music score.

Any help from You people is very welcome!

Thanks & regards,

Carlos.
 

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Forum Contributor 2010-2017
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Hi Carlos,
I am only a beginner but I have found that having a teacher is a big help especially for beginners like us. I do not know if you have a regular teacher or if you took a few lessons. Even though you are off-shore, you probably have access to the Internet. You might want to consider taking skype lessons with a mic and a webcam. Tim Price and several other people offer lessons over skype. This way you will have more frequent access to a teacher.

Good Luck
 

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Hi "Getafix",

Thanks for your suggestion!

Yes, skype is something I'm thinking about in order to keep a good learning curve. I'll have a look on these "on-line teachers".

My computer has already a very nice camera and mic.

Regards,

Carlos.
 

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Forum Contributor 2010-2017
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My teacher has recommended Rubank's series Elementary Method for Saxophones. There is also an Essential Elements series that other teachers recommend. There are also several teachers on SOTW who have developed their own online lessons that you can download.
 

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First, I second the advice to get a teacher, even if it's sporadic. Beginners can make some things really hard for themselves, and everyone needs guidance on the proper embouchure and air support when starting.

However, you sound like the kind of person that will have to do a lot of work on your own. Here is a list of things to work on that will keep you busy for the rest of your life.

Tone exercises. Play long tones, concentrating on holding steady pitch and volume, and improving tone color. This is the time to experiment with your embouchure (without doing anything bad, like straining or biting) and throat cavity, to learn the best way for you and your horn to make noise together.

Learn your scales and arpeggios. That means ALL of them - major, minor (melodic, harmonic, natural), pentatonic (major and minor), blues, all 7 modes (start with Dorian and Mixolydian), the more advanced scales like the diminished, "bebop", whole tone. In every key. By heart - that is, don't read scales and arpeggios from sheet music, but just play them. If that sounds like a lot, it is. Like I said, a lifetime study.

Note that beginners should do one scale in one key at a time, like for a week or two, before moving on.

Play melodies in the style that you like. This should be accompanied by listening a lot to music you like and admire. The music you hear when you first said to yourself "I want to play saxophone". Try to emulate the style and phrasing, and tone concept of the musicians you like.

Do a little of each of these every day. When you are first starting, don't feel discouraged that you cannot play "fast" or "hard". Play the scales you are working on slowly and accurately; if you can't play them slow, you won't be able to play them fast. Make sure that "woodshed" activities are accompanied by playing real music.

I actually don't recommend the "Elementary" methods. Technical exercises are appropriate for any style, but don't waste your time on, say, "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" if what you really want to play is "Howlin' Blues". Work on a nice simple blues tune in the range that you feel comfortable.

Oh yeah, use your ears.

Hope this helps,
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Steve,

Thanks You for your comments and suggestion. For sure, I'll arrange a teacher at my convenience. Skype would be a suitable option to save time and arrange a very good teacher.

I'm practising 40 minutes daily. I think I'll have to increase this time. As an aid for check the correct tone I'm using a metrome (iphone app).Most of the time i'm doing right :)

I'll have a look in the "Howlin Blues" when arrive at home since I have a strict limitation to use internet on board and cannot access youtube,skype,etc...Very limited bandwidth

Once again, many thanks for your time...

All the best,

Carlos.
 

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My alto sax instructor recommends Hal Leonard's Essential Elements 2000 (incl CD & DVD) Book 1. I also learned the chromatic scale, the 12 scales, major, minor, aug, dim, sus, 6th and 7th chords and long tones from my instructor. I believe the DVD has a website for access to a library of music. The CD is based on the songs in the book, great for play alongs.

Good Luck and Great PLaying!
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2011
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Take a look at my beginning sax method:
www.beginningsax.com

I have a couple of free sample lessons on the site, and a series of 10 downloadable lessons for sale with video, audio, and written instruction.

Good luck to you!

Randy
www.randyhunterjazz.com
Online Jazz Lessons and Books
Lesson Series:
Making Sense of Jazz Improvisation
Introduction to the Blues
The Arpeggio Circle
Through the Keys
and more...
Lessons page: www.beginningsax.com/Jazz Improv Lessons.htm
Rhythm Changes Demo: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrT0Xw_y9d0
Rhythm Changes Lesson:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMOW7QAfpwo
YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/saxtrax
 
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