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I start with old leaves and grass in a drum and add water every day and...
Oh! You said COMPOSING! My Bad!
 

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Yes, it seems so strange that many guitar players begin improvising with a simple little pentatonic pattern yet sax players often ignore this approach when beginning improvisation and regularly hit the "clunkers" on the strong beats...
The older I get, the more it seems evident that logic is not really a major factor in many decisions made by people who seem otherwise quite intelligent.

Nice work Bob.
 

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Actually, I've been experimenting with dodecahedronal dice (12 sided)
http://musiciansdice.com/
This allows me to sequence patterns without any type of conditioning, such as my own
or anyone else's, getting in the way. I find it extremely refreshing.


Any device that assist's in composition is beneficial. Anything that produces sound has relevance that can potentially enhance
a composer's inspiration.
 

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Actually, I've been experimenting with dodecahedronal dice (12 sided)
http://musiciansdice.com/
This allows me to sequence patterns without any type of conditioning, such as my own
or anyone else's, getting in the way. I find it extremely refreshing.


Any device that assist's in composition is beneficial. Anything that produces sound has relevance that can potentially enhance
a composer's inspiration.
That is really cool. Someone should make software that does this, complete with audio for those who play by ear. Cubase does have a note randomizer, maybe I should try practicing with that.
 

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I feel that any way we approach sequencing of sound in a more unfettered way is by chance.
Before I discovered musician's dice I was using regular dice but the 'odds' weren't equal.

I'm a huge fan of John Cage and his 'chance operational style'. I too wanted to 'remove'
my likes and dislikes and approach sound intervals/rhythm/melody/harmony from a completely
untouched source and 'chance' would be that source because it's totally free from previous influence.
Although Cage used primarily the I-Ching.
It's just another option.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yes, it seems so strange that many guitar players begin improvising with a simple little pentatonic pattern yet sax players often ignore this approach when beginning improvisation and regularly hit the "clunkers" on the strong beats...
So true.
 

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Yes, it seems so strange that many guitar players begin improvising with a simple little pentatonic pattern yet sax players often ignore this approach when beginning improvisation and regularly hit the "clunkers" on the strong beats...
I was told that there are no such thing as "wrong notes" in an improvised solo, they are just called "passing tones".
 

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I always thought that 'clunkers' were strictly an environmental subjective occurrence which definitely does not make them wrong!
Clunkers usually mean they are not part of the usual cliched approach which
happens to be anticipated by a predominant audience.

Clunkers can be looked upon as an abrupt happening that can bring a new train of thought
instantaneously to the performer as well as the audience...(fat chance), unless of course, the clunker, as well as the clunkee, determines that they should get back to the usual anticipated redundancy and renounce a possible new way to think or approach improvisation, which is the usual determination.

Clunkers have a vital importance!
 

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There are no wrong notes in recorded music because I edit them out!
What about live music?
What if a musician decided to play 'wrong notes' on purpose? However, they wouldn't be wrong to the player playing them because it
was a conscious decision. If so, then why? Artistic freedom? A pure love for sound of any kind without regard, or importance, what comes before or after a particular note? Possibly to p iss (man, I hate these censorship asterisks) others off because they don't understand the intervals and you might? Maybe to rebel against the redundancy of expectancy?

If it's a conscious effort then naturally the individual wouldn't be concerned how he sounds to their listeners. We obviously care too much how our music is heard by others and we don't care enough about our own sense of humor, if that were the case, or even our own sense of spontaneous exploration. Too much outside interference may dissuade this type of event because it's highly intimidating.
 

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I was told that there are no such thing as "wrong notes" in an improvised solo, they are just called "passing tones".
Yes, but a passing tone has to be placed in the right place so it's a passing tone and not a target note, landing squarely on the downbeat. I guess you could say there are no wrong notes; only notes wrongly placed.

Back to the OP, that's a really cool device. I'm going to play around with it...
 

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This is copied from the Tenori-on. I would love to get one but they are rather expensive. It came out before pad computers. It will be be awesome when they port it to that and have midi out on a pad computer.


http://tenori-onusa.com/
I have one of these. It's badass. Tone generator and sequencer, 16x16 voicings (including a lot of percussion), 16 separate layers per block, 16 blocks, scale control (ionian, dorian, etc.), octave control, pitch control within the selected scale, measure, meter, note length and tempo adjustment, and more. One can get some rad funk goin' on that thang.
 

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There's a heavy prejudice against the pentatonic scale among some jazz snob circles. What they don't realize is that pentatonic ideas can evolve chromatically in fantasically creative ways. Then when you actually MISS tritones you can work them in as well. In the pre-Aebersold era (the early '60s), systematically teaching improv was a mystery cuddled in an enigma wrapped in a taco. The best advice I got back then was "jamming advice", given with a wink from some "old pros" I hung out with at the music store they owned near my house. I know we've all heard it before but it's still funny and still true. Grateful props and RIP Bob Hackathorn and Hugh Moquin!

Jazz Rulez:

1) If you play a wrong note, play it again.
2) If you play a wrong note, the right note is a half step one way or the other, so scoot it!
3) If you can't convince 'em, confuse 'em.
4) If you get lost, go chromatic.
 
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