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Discussion Starter #1
Hello- I have an old Bundy flute that I had picked up to use casually. I had had a Bundy as a child, so started there when looking for a flute. I've since gotten an Emerson, and now am deciding what to do with the Bundy. The serial number is 91659- I think that puts it from the 60's - (if anyone knows the approximate year, I'd appreciate knowing). It is a student nickel-plated flute with no major dings or flaws. It needs new pads. I plan on being a "casual" flute player, using the flute mostly for building my breathing strength. I can sell this for around 30.00 or so, or I can put new pads on it and have a second flute. My question is, are the old Bundy flutes fairly decent in sound when they are properly padded and adjusted? I seem to think mine from childhood played fairly well. Thanks!

(P.S. I did search for this answer before posting, but couldn't find a post that spoke about Bundys playing well when properly padded.)
 

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I still have my Bundy student flute from the late 70s. A few years ago, I had it repadded...probably spent more than it was worth, but it's my childhood instrument, and it has sentimental value. I feel that it has a decent sound (I am a casual player), and I'm glad I've kept it all these years. :)
 

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Even with new pads, a nickel plated Bundy would not bring much more than $100 and the repad may cost more than that. I would just sell it as-is. If it is the one with the gray plastic case, it is OK but there are better choices now.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks to both of you - I think if it were my childhood Bundy, I'd definitely keep it - but maybe the funds for re-padding this one can go to sheet music, flute stand, etc. instead. Thanks!
 

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The old Bundy flutes were built like a tank and were the workhorse of the school beginning band programs for many years. Because of their heavy construction and mediocre headjoint design they simply do not come close to the response and projection of the modern day student flutes like the Yamaha and others.
 

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I agree with JBT. By todays standards, a rather disappointing student flute. Head for Yamaha.

And if it was your first repad job, then you would be in for a very, very long haul attempting to eliminate leaks and more than likely failing. It is more of a challenge than most DIY realise.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Which case is earlier - the grey with the logo on the end area, or the green with the logo in the center - anyone know? Thanks!
 

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Mine is a hard, textured, dark gray case with the logo toward the end, and it was bought new in about 1979, if that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, that does help - I think by the serial number (5 digits only) mine would be earlier, and I think I remember having the green case when I was a kid - around 1970 - The case I picked up for it is grey.
 

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Thanks, that does help - I think by the serial number (5 digits only) mine would be earlier, and I think I remember having the green case when I was a kid - around 1970 - The case I picked up for it is grey.
My serial number is six digits, starting with 428 or something like that.
 

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Gray case with logo in the center, green case logo in center, gray case logo offset, larger case. Before the plastic cases, they had the blue wood case.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
well, I have the wrong case- need the grey one with the center logo - no big deal. It's good to know the order of the cases produced though - helps in picking out a used flute if I ever get another one.
 
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