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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I play classical and currently have a yts 82z. Many people refer to it as a "classical horn" even though i think that has more to do with the mouthpiece and the player. My question is what am I missing out on with the 875? Is there really anything sospecial that I "have to have it" or is it just a matter of preference. I hear that the two have different keywork, though I'm not exactly sure how? could someone explain the difference to me? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you

Cristopher D. Johnson
 

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As far as I know, the 82z series is more geared towards jazz, and the 875 series for legit playing. It doesn't really matter though, you could do any genre fine on either horn. You are right- it's much more about the player's sound concept and mouthpiece choice.
 

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I also play classical music only on my YTS-82z with either a Vandoren V5 T20 or the T35. I see no compelling reason to consider an 875 though they are apparently very nice instruments.
 

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875 plays with a more locked in kind of tone. 82Z can be tough to keep centered. Though, I am really exaggerating, they are really more alike than they are different. Keep what you got and forge ahead!
 

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IMO you can get closer to a good classical sound with an 875 quicker and easier than with a Z, which to me has a somewhat (sorry) cruder sound that needs some taming.

BTW, I'm not sure who you listen to for advice, but I've never heard the Z tenor held up as a classical instrument.
 

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How do the necks factor into those differences? Doesn't the G3 ship with 875s and the G1 with 82zs? I prefer the G3 on my 82z tenor, and i remember reading someone mention liking G1 on the 875, but I dont know if it's a consensus.
 

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I play classical and currently have a yts 82z. Many people refer to it as a "classical horn" even though i think that has more to do with the mouthpiece and the player. My question is what am I missing out on with the 875? Is there really anything sospecial that I "have to have it" or is it just a matter of preference. I hear that the two have different keywork, though I'm not exactly sure how? could someone explain the difference to me? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you

Cristopher D. Johnson
I, for one, already pointed out to you in your other recent thread in this section that the 82Z is regarded primarily as a jazz instrument. So who are these ''many people'', who you seem to prefer to believe?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I, for one, already pointed out to you in your other recent thread in this section that the 82Z is regarded primarily as a jazz instrument. So who are these ''many people'', who you seem to prefer to believe?
I meant jazz. sorry
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That's true. Of course, you can also use torn out pages from a Sears and Roebuck catalog instead of toilet paper, but that doesn't mean it works as well for the job at hand.
I like to think it works rather well
 

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It works, but I'll choose a nice roll of two-ply every time.
Why, you can even use one square at a time. Fold it twice until you get a nice point on one end of the folds. Tear the folded point off. Open the square and it will reveal a hole. Put our finger through the hole. Use your imagination. Then you can slide the paper off of your finger, making it squeaky clean. Now that little pointy part you've saved? Use it like a fingernail file.

... or you could get yourself a nice roll of two-ply. Like you could get yourself a nice 875. :mrgreen:
 

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Why, you can even use one square at a time. Fold it twice until you get a nice point on one end of the folds. Tear the folded point off. Open the square and it will reveal a hole. Put our finger through the hole. Use your imagination. Then you can slide the paper off of your finger, making it squeaky clean. Now that little pointy part you've saved? Use it like a fingernail file.
Gary![rolleyes]

Yes, 875 for classical, although personally I haven't tried the tenors, but the altos are good classical instruments.
 

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So, which model is the Sears catalog & which is the t.p.?
I guess it depends on what you want to use it for. My point is that just because you could use either one (as others have pointed out), it doesn't mean that one isn't better than another for a particular application. I'm not a Yamaha man, so I don't know from personal experience, but I would trust Mike F.'s advice (posted above yours) on the 875 being the better choice for classical. So to answer your question, if classical music is an outhouse, the 875 is a roll of Charmin.
 

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Chris,

My advice is that of a beginner with 12 years of playing experience. (I haven’t played in the last seven years.) I tried out everything from Yamaha when I was choosing a horn to get back into playing and I really enjoyed how “easy blowing” the 875EX series was. As for one horn being for jazz and another for classical, I believe that a strong player can make just about anything work for their specific needs. For example, I believe Stan Getz would still have sounded amazing on a Selmer Bundy. I felt a bit of resistance from the 82Z model which I actually liked. It felt as though the horn was making me put in the effort to achieve a decent sound. From the Yamaha line, my favorite was the 875EX in black lacquer. I prefer a dark sound, and I felt that horn to have a really nice dark focused sound without being “muffled” by the extra lacquer. Then again, anyone’s miles will vary depending on who setup the horn and how much abuse it’s taken from players like me. I personally would recommend sticking with what you have if it performs the way you want it too. It’s just like purchasing a car, go with what feels right regardless if someone says this is better or that’s worse. But like I began my post, my advice is that of a player getting back into the sport, but that was my personal experience in playing both instruments.

Respectfully,
John
 

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Chris,

My advice is that of a beginner with 12 years of playing experience. (I haven't played in the last seven years.) I tried out everything from Yamaha when I was choosing a horn to get back into playing and I really enjoyed how "easy blowing" the 875EX series was. As for one horn being for jazz and another for classical, I believe that a strong player can make just about anything work for their specific needs. For example, I believe Stan Getz would still have sounded amazing on a Selmer Bundy. I felt a bit of resistance from the 82Z model which I actually liked. It felt as though the horn was making me put in the effort to achieve a decent sound. From the Yamaha line, my favorite was the 875EX in black lacquer. I prefer a dark sound, and I felt that horn to have a really nice dark focused sound without being "muffled" by the extra lacquer. Then again, anyone's miles will vary depending on who setup the horn and how much abuse it's taken from players like me. I personally would recommend sticking with what you have if it performs the way you want it too. It's just like purchasing a car, go with what feels right regardless if someone says this is better or that's worse. But like I began my post, my advice is that of a player getting back into the sport, but that was my personal experience in playing both instruments.

Respectfully,
John
Do you mean that a black lacquered horn has a darker more focused sound because it has less lacquer than a lacquered horn which is muffled because it has thicker lacquer?
 
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